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Full Review at: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D7000/D7000A.HTM

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Nikon D7000 digital camera image
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Nikon D7000

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Nikon D7000 Viewfinder

The Nikon D7000's viewfinder is rated at 100% coverage, and is a bright, pentaprism design with 0.94x magnification at 50mm and -1 diopter, and a 19.5mm eyepoint. A diopter adjustment dial to the top-right on the viewfinder eyepiece offers a diopter adjustment range of -3 to +1.

The focusing screen is a fixed (non-interchangeable) type B BriteView Clear Matte Mark II screen. A framing grid (shown below) can be displayed on demand via a Custom menu setting. The active focus area can be highlighted in red or black (normally, the active area is highlighted in black only). There are three AF Point Illumination Custom settings available: Auto, which highlights when needed to establish contrast with the background; On, which always highlights, and Off, which disables the red highlighting.

The data readout below the focusing screen is similar to the D90, though the focus indicator has an enhanced range-finder function (the arrows indicate the direction to manually focus), the numerical field at the extreme right shows additional settings such as Active D-Lighting amount and AF-area mode when those features are adjusted, as well as some other minor changes. Compared to the D300S, the D7000's viewfinder doesn't show current metering mode, exposure mode or a full-time ISO display, though it does show some information the D300S does not, such as the no-card warning, B/W mode, range-finder arrows, tilt display, AF-area mode and Active D-Lighting amount.

The graphic (courtesy of Nikon USA) and table below shows what information is displayed in D7000's viewfinder.


1
On-demand framing grid
15
Flash-ready indicator
2
Focus areas
16
FV lock indicator
Spot metering targets
17
Flash sync indicator
3
AF area brackets
18
Aperture stop indicator
4
Battery indicator
19
Electronic analog exposure display
5
Black and White indicator
Exposure compensation display
6
No memory card warning
Tilt indicator
7
Focus indicator
20
Flash compensation indicator
8
Autoexposure (AE) lock
21
Exposure compensation indicator
9
Shutter speed
22
Auto ISO sensitivity indicator
AF mode
23
Number of exposures remaining
10
Aperture
Number of shots remaining before memory buffer fills
11
Low battery warning
ISO sensitivity
12
Exposure and flash bracketing indicator
Preset WB recording indicator
WB bracketing indicator
Exposure compensation value
ADL bracketing indicator
Flash compensation value
13
ISO sensitivity indicator
Active D-Lighting amount
14
"K" (appears when memory remains for over 1,000 frames)
AF-area mode

 

Viewfinder Test Results

Coverage
Very good accuracy with the optical viewfinder, excellent on the LCD monitor in Live View mode.

70mm, Optical 70mm, Live View LCD

The Nikon D7000's optical viewfinder proved fairly accurate, with almost 98% coverage when measured with our Sigma 70mm f/2.8 test lens. This is very good for a non-pro model, but short of the 100% coverage Nikon claims. That said, though, it's tough to frame to within a percent or two when squinting through a viewfinder eyepiece, so the actual accuracy could be a shade higher than we measured here. The resulting image is shifted vertically and slanted slightly to the left, which is unfortunately isn't uncommon with optical viewfinders these days. The camera's Live View LCD mode was extremely accurate, with essentially 100% coverage in our measurements.