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Nikon D3200

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Nikon D3200 Flash


 

Flash photography has been a particular strength of Nikon SLRs for some time now, and the D3200 follows suit, with its implementation of Nikon's 3D Color Matrix II metering for flash exposures. This advanced exposure metering system takes advantage of subject-distance information relayed by the lens to compute more accurate flash exposures than more conventional systems based on reflected light alone.

Like the D3100 and D5100, flash capability is an area where the Nikon D3200 lacks some substantial capability relative to the company's higher models, though, in that its built-in flash can't serve as a Commander in Nikon's Wireless Lighting System. You can still use the Nikon D3200 to control multiple remote flash units via an SB-910, SB-900, SB-800 or SB-700 flash strobe or Nikon's SU-800 remote commander, but the built-in flash doesn't have that ability on its own.

The flash modes available vary depending on the setting of the mode dial, with some of the more automated/programmed modes restricting your choices. The full list of flash modes includes Off, Auto, Auto+Red-Eye Reduction, Auto+Slow Sync+Red-Eye Reduction, Auto+Slow Sync, Fill Flash, Red-Eye Reduction, Slow Sync+Red-Eye Reduction, Slow Sync, Rear Curtain, and Rear Curtain+Slow Sync. Auto modes automatically pop the flash up as needed in poor lighting or backlit scenes, though the "Flash Off" auto mode prevents the use of flash even in poor light. Fill flash fires the flash strobe with shutter speeds as fast as 1/200 second, helping soften shadows in brightly lit environments. Red-Eye Reduction mode fires the (very bright white) AF-assist light before the main flash exposure, to reduce the effects of red-eye in shots of people. Slow Sync fires the flash at the start of exposure, and uses a slower shutter speed to capture background lighting, reducing the harsh effect of flash shots by allowing more of the ambient illumination into the picture. Finally, Rear-Curtain fires the flash at the end of the exposure, producing light trails that appear to follow (rather than precede) moving subjects. A Manual flash exposure mode is also available, accessed from the bottom of the Shooting menu.

Flash exposure compensation can be set over a range of -3 to +1 EV by holding the Flash and Exposure Compensation buttons down simultaneously, while rotating the Command Dial. (Flash exposure can also be adjusted from the Information Display, using the Multi-Controller arrow keys, which some users may find more straightforward.)

The Nikon D3200 has a 1/200 second maximum X-Sync speed, and its built-in flash is not FP-capable. Basically, this means that the on-board flash can't sync at shutter speeds greater than 1/200 second. There also doesn't appear to be any support for external flash units that are FP-capable, so it seems that 1/200 second is the fastest shutter speed you'll be able to use with the flash, regardless of mode or flash source.

Besides the main flash modes listed above, the Nikon D3200's onboard speedlight can also be used in manual mode, in which you can set its power output to fixed levels of full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 power. The Nikon D3200's internal flash is fairly powerful, with a guide number of 12 meters or 39 feet at ISO 100 in auto mode, extending slightly to 13 meters (43 feet) in manual mode. The greater range in manual mode is because it doesn't have to expend energy on the metering pre-flash. (Novices should note that 39 feet is the guide number, not the range. Divide the guide number by your lens' aperture setting to produce the actual range in feet.)

Also included on the Nikon D3200 is an external flash hot shoe, just behind the pop-up flash compartment, but there's no separate PC-style sync terminal as found on Nikon's higher-end cameras. (An optional sync terminal adapter for the hot shoe is however available.) The hot shoe accommodates Nikon accessory flash units, as well as a wide range of third party flashes. The full range of flash sync modes remains available for compatible flash units, but third-party models may not support all modes. Different Nikon speedlights offer different features when used on the D3200 as well. Recent Nikon flashes such as the SB-910, SB-900, SB-800, SB-700, SB-600, and SB-400 will support i-TTL balanced fill flash and standard i-TTL flash. The SB-910, SB-900, SB-700, and SB-800 will also support distance priority manual flash, and auto-aperture flash with the SB-910, SB-900, and SB-800, when used with a CPU lens. Flashes only capable of non-TTL (non through-the-lens metering) auto or manual flash modes include older models such as the SB-80DX, SB-28DX, SB-28, SB-27, and SB-22S.

3D Color Matrix II Flash Metering
As noted above, the "3D" aspect of the Nikon metering system is that it uses subject distance information from the lens (only available with G or D-type lenses) to guide its exposure decisions. This is particularly key with flash exposures, because flash illumination falls off quite strongly as the subject gets further from the camera. The "Color Matrix" part of the name refers to the use of a 420-segment RGB sensor for exposure determination, which significantly improves the accuracy with which the camera can determine various scene types, for lookup in its 30,000-image exposure database. We at IR are huge fans of Nikon's flash technology, it's really a case of technology working perfectly in the service of creativity. The camera just quietly does its job, so you can focus on composition, color, interacting with your subjects, etc. It doesn't remove the creative decisions of how you want to light your subject, it simply removes the technical aspect from the equation. It won't by any means turn a duffer into a pro photographer, but it'll certainly take an average shooter a long way in that direction.

The Nikon D3200 with Nikon's Creative Lighting System
Nikon has long been a leader in flash technology, but in late 2003, they significantly upped the ante with their Creative Lighting System. This system of flashes and supporting camera bodies lets the photographer control up to three separate groups of remote flash units, with an essentially unlimited number of individual strobes in each group. The exposure and operating mode of each group of flashes can be controlled independently, and exposure is metered through the lens (TTL) for all units.

While the D3200 built-in flash can't act as a controller for remote strobes, it's perfectly compatible with the system if you slip an SB-910, SB-900, SB-800 or SB-700 flash unit, or SU-800 commander into its hot-shoe. The control and creative freedom Nikon's Wireless Lighting system offers is truly amazing: See our Nikon Creative Lighting System review for more info.

 

Flash Test Results

Coverage and Range
Good flash performance, with good intensity but uneven coverage at wide-angle. Our standard shots required an average amount of compensation.

18mm 55mm
Normal Flash
+0.7 EV
Slow-Sync Flash
Default

Coverage and Exposure. Flash coverage was rather uneven at wide-angle (18mm), with very dark corners. Coverage at telephoto (55mm) was much better, but still somewhat uneven. (Some of the corner shading is due to the lens itself, though.) For our Indoor Portrait scene test, the Nikon D3200's flash required +0.7 EV exposure compensation adjustment to get bright results in normal Auto flash mode with a 1/60 second shutter speed, which is about average for the SLRs we've tested. The camera's Slow-Sync flash mode at 1/8 second produced bright results without any compensation, though with a stronger pinkish-orange cast from the room lighting.

Flash Range: Wide Angle
6 ft 7 ft 8 ft 9 ft 10 ft 11 ft
Click to see D3200FL06W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL07W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL08W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL09W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL10W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL11W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
12 ft 13 ft 14 ft 15 ft 16 ft
Click to see D3200FL12W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL13W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL14W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL15W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL16W.JPG
1/60 sec
f3.5
ISO 200

Flash Range: Telephoto
6 ft 7 ft 8 ft 9 ft 10 ft 11 ft
Click to see D3200FL06T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL07T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL08T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL09T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL10T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL11T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
12 ft 13 ft 14 ft 15 ft 16 ft
Click to see D3200FL12T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL13T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL14T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL15T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL16T.JPG
1/60 sec
f5.6
ISO 200

ISO 200 Range. With the kit lens at wide-angle, the Nikon D3200's flash exposures started out a little dim at 6 feet, though brightness increased before decreasing, peaking at 7 feet. Image brightness didn't start dropping off noticeably until after 11 feet. At the telephoto end, flash intensity started out a bit dim at 6 feet, and exposures varied with some longer distances brighter than shorter ones. Flash exposures were still usable to about 14 feet, which is quite good.


Manufacturer-Specified Flash Range
Wide Angle Telephoto
Click to see D3200FL_MFR174WM0200.JPG
17.4 feet
ISO 200
Click to see D3200FL_MFR106TM0200.JPG
10.6 feet
ISO 200

Manufacturer Specified Flash Test. The Nikon D3200's flash guide number is 13 meters in manual mode at ISO 100. At ISO 200, that translates to about 17.4 feet at f/3.5 and 10.6 feet at f/5.6, the maximum apertures of the kit lens at full wide-angle and telephoto respectively. In the shots above, the D3200 appears to underperform by a small amount relative to Nikon's specification, producing slightly dim exposures at the rated distances. The flash target was underexposed by less than 1/4 f-stop compared to the ideal exposure in both cases. Our standard test method for flash range uses a fixed setting of ISO 200, to provide a fair basis of comparison between cameras. We've now also begun shooting two shots using the manufacturer-specified camera settings, at the range the company claims for the camera, to assess the validity of the specific claims.