We've provided this printable version of our review for your convenience. Please remember that your shopping clicks support this site. If you think this camera is a good choice for you, please consider returning to the link below to check prices and make a purchase via our shopping links.

Also note that this is just one of the pages from this review. Full reviews have several pages with complete analysis of the many test shots we take with each camera. Feel free to download and print them out to see how the camera will perform for you.

Full Review at: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/pentax-k5-iis/pentax-k5-iisA.HTM

Like this camera?
Save money online!
Prices as of 10/21/2014
Pentax K-5 IIs digital camera image
Save Money!
Pentax K-5 IIs

$777.69



- That's the average, click to find the BEST price!

Your shopping clicks support this site, help keep the reviews coming!

Pentax K-5 IIs Video Recording

Like most DSLRs nowadays, the Pentax K-5 IIs offers at least some HD video recording capability. Pentax hasn't been a big player in the HD-DSLR arena, and unfortunately, the updated K-5 IIs and K-5 II don't make much of an entrance. The K-5 II models do finally add full 1,920 x 1,080 HD resolution video (up from the 720p video of the K-5), however they only shoot 1080p video at 25 frames per second, which is a bit strange, particularly for the US and other NTSC markets where frame rates like 24p and 30p are more common and compatible. They also shoot at 720p resolution at 25 and 30 frames per second, but there are no faster frame rates like 60p or 50p. There's also a standard definition video resolution of 640 x 480 at both 25 and 30 frames per second. Each video resolution has three image quality (compression) levels.

Other features for video recording are rather slim, with only one recording format, a built-in monaural microphone (although there is an external mic jack) and a 25 minute limit to video recording. There are also various special effects filters and scene modes that can be applied to videos as well.

One quite interesting and unique feature is the camera's body-based Shake Reduction technology, so rather than lens-based image stabilization, the camera itself handles the I.S., providing a stabilized image with any lens. The cool thing about this is that it works for video recording, too. We've seen other manufacturers with sensor-shift image stabilization, but it's often disabled for video recording. This is quite versatile and convenient.

Although the Pentax K-5 IIs packs an array of powerful and unique features for still images in a camera at this price point, the video side of things doesn't seem to be this camera's strong suit. Using this camera for video feels like stepping into a time machine back to the burgeoning days of DSLR video recording -- minimal features, sightly clunky operation and technical limitations. Here's the full rundown of the K-5 IIs' video capabilities, along with our usual selection of sample videos.

NOTE: The Pentax K-5 II features identical specifications regarding video recording, so the video pages for these two cameras will be very similar.

Pentax K-5 IIs Basic Video Specs

Pentax K-5 IIs Video: Image Size, Frame Rate, and Encoding

The Pentax K-5 IIs is fairly limited in terms of recording file format, resolution and frame rates.

Pentax K-5 IIs Video Options
M-JPEG Format (MotionJPEG, .AVI files)
Resolution
Aspect Ratio
Frame Rate

1,920 x 1,080

16:9

25 frames per second

1,280 x 720

16:9

30 frames per second

25 frames per second

640 x 480

4:3

30 frames per second

25 frames per second

The Pentax K-5 IIs offers a very simple menu when it comes to video resolution, frame rates and file formats. It features a single file format, Motion JPEG in an AVI container, in three resolutions, 1,920 x 1,080, 1,280 x 720, and 640 x 480. At 1080p resolution, the only option for frame rates is 25 fps, which, as mentioned above, is quite odd given that this camera is also sold in non-PAL countries where 25p is not a standard frame rate. Users are also given the choice of 720p HD video in 30p and 25p frame rates as well as VGA resolution video 30p and 25p.

There are three levels of image quality for each resolution video: Best, Better and Good. Pentax do not indicate specific bitrates for each quality level, however, but they do indicate that approximate recording time limits for a standard 4GB memory card:

Pentax K-5 IIs Video Recording Times & Estimated Bit Rates
Resolution
Quality Level
Time
Est. Bit Rate
1080p, 25p
Best
5 min, 17 sec
101 Mbps
Better
6 min, 57 sec
77 Mbps
Good
9 min, 43 sec
55 Mbps
720p, 30p
Best
8 min, 31 sec
63 Mbps
Better
13 min, 03 sec
41 Mbps
Good
18 min, 07 sec
29 Mbps
720p, 25p
Best
10 min, 12 sec
52 Mbps
Better
15 min, 35 sec
34 Mbps
Good
21 min, 37 sec
25 Mbps
VGA, 30p
Best
25 min, 08 sec
21 Mbps
Better
37 min, 57 sec
14 Mbps
Good
51 min, 34 sec
10 Mbps
VGA, 25p
Best
30 min, 01 sec
18 Mbps
Better
44 min, 41 sec
12 Mbps
Good
1 hr, 0 min, 57 sec
9 Mbps

The downside to using a video format like Motion JPEG, which is quite simple to decode, is that it's not as efficient in its compression scheme as more advanced codecs, like H.264/MPEG-4 AVC encoding (as is used in the Panasonic GH3, for example). As such, video files from the Pentax K-5 IIs can grow to massive sizes. Pentax puts a limit of 25 minutes of continuous recording or a 4GB file, whichever comes first. Given the M-JPEG inefficiency with compression, it's not surprising that you can record 1080p Best quality video for only about 5 min, 17 sec.

Pentax K-5 IIs Video: Image Quality

The K-5 IIs produces nice image quality overall at both 1080p and 720p resolutions with a decent level of detail and good colors, if a bit saturated at the default "Bright" picture settings. However, videos aren't as crisp and finely detailed as other video-capable still cameras like the GH3.

The camera also struggled in our standard night videos, particularly with shadow details. The Pentax K-5 IIs does not allow users to set the ISO in video mode, contributing to the low-light videos looking underexposed. There was also a lot of high-ISO noise throughout the frame, despite the ISO apparently not being high enough for a good exposure.

Take a look at our standard set of sample videos below (note: the Pentax K-5 II was used for these):

Pentax K-5 II: Video Samples
1,920 x 1,080
AVI
, Progressive, 25 frames per second
Download Original
1,280 x 720
AVI
, Progressive, 30 frames per second
Download Original
1,920 x 1,080
AVI
, Progressive, 25 frames per second, Night
Download Original
1,280 x 720
AVI
, Progressive, 30 frames per second, Night
Download Original

Moiré, aliasing & color artifacts

The only difference between the K-5 II and K-5 IIs is that the "s" model lacks an optical low-pass filter (LPF). The removal of this filter helps produce slightly sharper, more detailed images. The downside is that without this filter, users run the risk of having more moiré and aliasing artifacts in their images.

Moiré and aliasing artifacts were quite severe on the K-5 IIs, just like we saw on the K-5 II. These distortions appeared on many objects in the frame, such as roofing shingles, window screens and blinds, and even the small leaves and fronds of the sweet grass bushes.

Many people wouldn't expect to find moiré artifacts in video from the version of the camera that has a low-pass filter, but optical low-pass filters are designed to operate at the individual pixel level, at still-image resolutions. Because video resolution is so much lower, the optical LPF has no effect on aliasing. Aliasing and moiré are a significant problem in DSLR video, because most cameras don't have (remotely) enough processing horsepower to do anti-aliasing processing in firmware.

We did, however, see more color artifacts from the K-5 IIs compared to the K-5 II, which is due to the lack of an optical LPF. You can see an example of this below in a frame grab from our rolling shutter sample video:

moiré

Pentax K-5 IIs: Moiré & Color Artifacts Sample Video
Purple and green gutter! Sample video trimmed from beginning of rolling shutter video.

Pentax K-5 IIs Video: Focusing

The Pentax K-5 IIs is one of the rare video-capable DSLRs released recently that doesn't feature some form of continuous autofocus. And the K-5 IIs doesn't offer many of the bells and whistles for video focusing that we've seen in other recent cameras, such as focus peaking.

Pentax K-5 IIs Video: Exposure Control

As with focusing, the Pentax K-5 IIs is pretty sparse when it comes to features for exposure settings, with most most of the video exposure controls automatically chosen for you. The only exposure options the user is given are aperture and exposure compensation, while other settings like shutter speed and, surprisingly, ISO sensitivity are automatically adjusted.

There is, however, an unofficial "hack" to have full manual exposure in video mode on the Pentax K-5 IIs (K-5 II):

Pentax K-5 IIs Video: Audio Recording

The Pentax K-5 IIs provides only the most basic of audio recording features for Movie Mode: mono audio with the built-in mic and no adjustable recording level, but with the ability to attach an external stereo mic.

Pentax K-5 IIs Video: Rolling Shutter Artifacts ("Jello Effect")

Almost every video-capable still camera on the market distorts rapidly moving objects, or the entire scene, if the camera is panned quickly. The technical term for this is "rolling shutter artifacts," but many users simply call it the "Jello effect," because the image can jiggle and sway like Jello as the camera is moved. This occurs because the image is captured and read out line by line, so the bottom of an object may no longer be underneath the top of it by the time the camera gets around to capturing that part of the frame.

The Pentax K-5 IIs sadly displays pretty severe rolling shutter artifacts. On both 1080/25p and 720/30p, with and without Shake Reduction enabled, rolling shutter was pretty noticeable. (Note: Shake Reduction was disabled for the two sample videos below.) On a couple subsequent tests, even when panning slowly, rolling shutter artifacts were produced easily.

Pentax K-5 IIs: Rolling Shutter Artifacts
1,920 x 1,080
AVI
, Progressive, 25 frames per second
Download Original
1,280 x 720
AVI
, Progressive, 30 frames per second
Download Original

There are plug-ins out there to fix rolling shutter when editing your footage on the computer, but software correction is not a surefire solution. It's simply something that you must keep in mind when moving the camera while recording video. If you just pan slowly while filming, you're not likely to notice them much at all.