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Printer Reviews
(sorted by manufacturer)

New Printers
Discontinued Printers

Canon
Canon PIXMA MG5220 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (August 2010)
Design to be equally at home in the college dorm or home office, the WiFi MG5220 offers a quick photo-quality printer (including a versatile card reader), a competent reflective scanner that can handle originals up to about an inch thick and common copier functions with a nice enlargement/reduction range. Read our review for the story.
Canon PIXMA MG6120 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (February 2011)
Our In Context report compares the $200 Canon MG6120 to the company's entry-level $150 Pixma MG5220 and top-end $300 Pixma MG8120 all-in-one-devices. It's not a full review, but it is a comprehensive comparison.
Canon PIXMA MG8120 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (November 2010)
The Pixma MG8120 is the flagship of Canon's recently revamped lineup of multifunction devices. Like the previously reviewed MG5220, it's dressed in a shiny piano black finish with a single silver accent on the front lid. But where the MG5220 kept things pretty simple on the control panel, the MG8120 introduces the company's Intelligent Touch System of back-lit touch-sensitive buttons and Light Guidance, which illuminates only the active buttons. It's quite a step up from what we saw on the MG5220. Read our review for the details.
Canon PIXMA MP640 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (January 2010)
It's just a little bigger than the MP620 we called "quite a deal" in our review a year ago, but Canon claims the new MP640 is much faster. But duplex printing returns to this PIXMA, we're glad to see. Read our review for all the details.
Canon PIXMA MX892 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (July 2012)
There were two things that intrigued us about the Canon Pixma MX892 when we read the press release announcing its introduction. First, we wondered how well a current generation office printer could print photos. And secondly, we wondered how well Canon had implemented AirPrint for printing from an iPad. We answer both questions in our review.
Canon PIXMA Pro-1 Inkjet Printer
by Mike Pasini
With 12 inks in tanks (not little cartridges) to handle both color and grayscale printing on everything from glossy to fine arts 13x19 sheets, the Pro-1 redefines the professional photo printer. Read our review for the story.

Canon Pro-1 Ten Months Later
by Mike Pasini
In 10 months we've learned a few more things about the Pro-1. And we haven't forgotten that in our original review, we promised a further report detailing our experience printing fine arts papers. And we were also able, in those 10 months, to toss in a review of the Pro-1's chief competitor, the Epson R3000. So here's our
updated report, with an emphasis on printing third-party fine arts papers, as originally promised.

Canon PIXMA Pro-10 Inkjet Printer
by Mike Pasini (October 2012)
We've received a review unit and put together a little information about the Pro-10 pigment printer on our landing page, with a healthy section on the new Print Studio Pro. Check page soon for the full reivew.
Canon PIXMA Pro-100 Inkjet Printer
by Mike Pasini (October 2012)
Conventional wisdom is that you need a pigment printer to convince customers your prints are permanent. Wiser souls know nothing is permanent. Wise guys know the trick is to have the prints outlive you. And for a long time dye prints have been capable of that. And they've extended their longevity while pigment prints have been scratching their print heads trying to figure out how to look as brilliant as a dye print. So we were pretty excited to learn Canon had introduce a pigment printer in its new Pro line. And after reviewing it, we're still excited. See why!
Canon PIXMA Pro9000 Mark II Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (June 2009)
The new $500 Pro9000 Mark II is three times faster than the original Pro9000, which we applauded for its "vibrant color, fast printing and versatile media handling that challenges not just the i9900 but pigment-based 13x19 printers."
Canon PIXMA Pro9500 Mark II Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (December 2009)
Canon designed the Pro9500 Mark II for what it calls "professional printing performance for large archival photos." Turns out, those aren't idle words. Our full review considers this pigment-based printer in light of the recent improvements in dye-based inks.
Epson
Epson Artisan 810 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (December 2009)
Unlike most of the all-in-one printers we've reviewed recently, the 810 can fax (even in color), print on CD/DVDs, charge your portable devices and talk WiFi and Ethernet. And it offers a large, attractive (and smart) touch panel to control the device. Oh, it also prints photos from 4x6 to lettersize on a variety of Epson photo papers using a six-color Claria inking system. Both sides of the sheet, too. Read our review for the whole story.
Epson Stylus Photo R2000 Inkjet Printer
by Mike Pasini (August 2011)
At $499.99 list and as low as $279.99 directly from the company, the Epson Stylus Photo R2000, which replaces the R1900, brings more than just 13x19-inch pigment printing to the party, adding CD, roll and fine art media, UltraChrome Hi-Gloss 2 inks and WiFi/USB/Ethernet connectivity. Read our review for the whole story.
Epson Stylus Photo R3000 Inkjet Printer
by Mike Pasini (June 2012)
The R3000 competes directly with the Canon Pro-1, offering both color and black and white 13x19-ink pigment printing. But the R3000 has a few tricks up its sleeve, like its K3 ink set, marvelous paper handling and extensive connectivity options. We tested a handful of third-party fine arts papers on both printers and showed the results to our visitors. Read our review for the whole story.
Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard Envy 110 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (January 2012)
There are quite a few things we liked about the $249.99 Envy 110 but there are enough misses that we'd hold out for the Envy 410. And while we used the Envy exclusively as our all-in-one device for a while, we discovered one fatal flaw. Read our review for the whole story.
Hewlett-Packard Photosmart Premium Printer
by Mike Pasini (January 2010)
The most intriguing feature of the Premium is its ability to print nicely laid-out pages from a number of Web sites. This trick is performed by installing apps hosted by HP on the printer to access the sites and print the information. HP's touch screen interface is a pleasure to use but we had some problems with image quality on the scans. Prints were very nice in both color and black and white.
Kodak
Kodak ESP 5250 Printer
by Mike Pasini (December 2009)
We put the Kodak ESP 5250 all-in-one device through our excruciating holiday test suite (including bar-coded label printing of the family Christmas card list, instant-dry photo Christmas card production, and the Inevitable Eggnog Survival Test). Read our (rather lengthy) review to see what happened.
HiTi
Kodak ESP 7250 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (December 2010)
The Kodak ESP 7250 is the company's idea of the essential all-in-one device. With a scanner for reflective originals and a printer that can handle both plain paper and photo paper, the 7250 offers a number of ways to connect: WiFi, Ethernet, USB, a card reader, Bluetooth (with an optional adapter) and even from your iOS or Android device. Read our review for the details.

Printer Reviews
(Discontinued Models)

Canon
Canon CP-100 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
Canon creates a nifty little photo printer that spools out sharp 4x6 prints right from your Canon camera (no computer needed, but only Canon cameras are supported)!
Canon i9900 Inkjet Printer
by Mike Pasini (October 2004)
In our previous printer reviews, HP stunned us with gorgeous dye-based inkjet prints and Epson impressed us with extraordinary pigment-based prints on a variety of media. How could Canon compete? Start with a nicely designed box, add eight-ink printing with optical reservoir monitoring, plus some slick software -- with prints as large as 13x19. Read all about it.
Canon PIXMA iP6600D Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (March 2006)
Inkjet printers have been producing gorgeous color prints for some time now. But have they matured? The latest models refine the class with faster printing and higher resolution but reformulate their inks as well. Beyond the basics, they're starting to add more features to distinguish themselves, including card readers, LCD monitors for in-printer editing, wireless connectivity and duplex printing. Canon's $199.99 PIXMA iP6600D Photo Printer is a case in point.
Canon PIXMA MP620 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (December 2008)
All-in-one printers are fast replacing everything but 13x19 printers. And as they do, they're offering WiFi connectivity so every computer in the house can use them. Canon's MP620 not only prints wirelessly but scans wirelessly, too. And for a list price of only $150.
Canon PIXMA MP950 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (June 2006)
Canon's MP950 is not just a printer. It's a copier and scanner, too. But it doesn't just scan reflective copy -- it can scan color negs and slides. Read our review for the full story.
Canon PIXMA MP980 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (January 2009)
Canon's well-engineered MP line has impressed us even at the low end with the MP620 and the top of the line MP980 simply fills out our wish list with film scanning and duplex printing. It may still only have four color inks but they do the job of six. And the film scanning is impressive, outperforming inexpensive desktop scanners.
Canon PIXMA Pro9000 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (December 2006)
It's tough to follow a gem like the i9900 but the Pro9000 delivers the same fast print speeds but with ChromaLife100 inks and a new thick-media front feed design for Canon's Fine Arts papers and other specialty media.
Canon S800 Bubble Jet Printer
by Mike Pasini
Up to 2,400 x 1,200 dpi, six-color process for fine detail, smooth gradations; 4 picoliter droplet size for "invisible" dots in highlights; 25-year print life (on Canon Photo Paper Pro); Dual Parallel/USB computer interface, compatible with Mac or PC.
Canon Selphy CP510 & CP710 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (July 2006)
The compact 4x6 dye sub printer is famous for trouble-free prints and Canon has two. The $100 CP510 (with PictBridge and Direct Print or USB) and the $150 CP710 (adding a 2.5-inch LCD and card reader) can both print 4x8s and run off battery power, too. Read our review for the details.
Epson
Epson R800 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (June 2004)
When some desperate soul grabs our lapels as we're trying to cross the street and demands to know which photo printer to buy, we shrug our shoulders and confide, "You really can't go wrong these days." But there are a lot of ways you can go right with the Epson R800.
Epson Stylus Photo 1280 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
Improved lightfastness, up to 25 years for framed prints on Epson Heavyweight Matte Paper; Border Free photo printing up to 11x14 inches; true 6-color photo printer with near-invisible 4 picoliter droplets; 2880 dpi for ultra-smooth, ultra-sharp photos.
Epson Stylus Photo 2000 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
Amazing lightfastness, rated at 200+ years for framed prints on Epson Archival Matte Paper. Border Free photo printing on some paper sizes. True, six-color photo printer using pigmented inks for long print life. 1440 dpi for smooth, sharp photos.
Epson Stylus Photo 2200 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (January 2004)
Long lost review recovered! Well, not actually, but we did finally get around to writing up our review of the venerable Epson Stylus Photo 2200. You can bet, if we hadn't liked it, we wouldn't have kept it around so long . Read our report.
Epson Stylus Photo 780 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
Improved lightfastness, up to 25 years for framed prints on Epson Heavyweight Matte Paper, BorderFree photo printing up to 8.5 x 11 inches, true 6-color photo printer with near-invisible 4 picoliter droplets.
Epson Stylus Photo 785EPX Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
Improved lightfastness, up to 25 years for framed prints on Epson Heavyweight Matte Paper, incorporates Epson's new PRINT Image Matching to automatically color correct prints, BorderFree photo printing up to 8.5 x 11 inches, true 6-color photo printer with near-invisible 4 picoliter droplets.
Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard Photosmart 7960 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (October 2003)
Hewlett-Packard invented the thermal inkjet printer (Canon the bubble and Epson the piezo, according to the rock painting on the wall behind us). But with the Photosmart 7960, HP has focused its expertise on creating the Ideal Home Photo Printing Experience. Make it easy, Carly said, to print digital images without resorting to Windows.
Hewlett-Packard Photosmart A626 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (September 2007)
It wasn't really that long ago that we fell in love with a Fargo 4x6 dye sub printer. Some of those 4x6 prints are still around but most of them have faded quite a bit. Somehow in the intervening years, inkjet technology has outrun dye sublimation printing, providing less expensive but longer-lasting prints. And HP has been at the forefront of inkjet development. The A626, HP's new $179.99 compact printer, invigorates the best of its compact technology with a touch-screen transfusion. Read our review for the whole story.
Hewlett-Packard Photosmart B8550 Printer
by Mike Pasini (January 2009)
HP had a bright idea one day. There's really nothing different about a big printer except the carriage length. Everything in a big printer has to be in a small 4x6 printer, too: the printhead, the inks, the firmware, the control panel, maybe a card reader, the inputs, the whole ball of wax. Enter the B8550 (and for just under $300). Read our review for the full story.
Hewlett-Packard Photosmart C4680 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (April 2009)
The HP Photosmart C4680 is a sleek all-in-one device that retails for $99.99. The scanner/printer includes a card reader (that doesn't, however, handle CompactFlash) and one USB port. But its most significant feature is the TouchSmart frame surrounding the 1.5-inch LCD that makes using the device much simpler than others we've tried. For the full story, read our review -- including both an unboxing gallery and a software install gallery.
Hewlett-Packard Photosmart C8180 All-in-One Printer
by Mike Pasini (June 2008)
The HP C8180 is the company's top of the line all-in-one device, mating a 9600-dpi scanner capable of both reflective and transparency scanning with a printer that also includes CD/DVD burning and label printing with LightScribe. But it also wins the Ms. Congeniality Award for its touchscreen interface, card reader and its connectivity options: Hi-Speed USB, PictBridge, Wireless G and Bluetooth. We liked it so much, we kept "testing" it for months. Read our review for the full story.
Hewlett-Packard Photosmart D7160 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (August 2006)
It's fast and it's quiet and the LCD menu system is well designed. Print from the built-in card reader, PictBridge port or USB 2.0 Hi-Speed connection. Individual ink cartridges, coded HP Advanced photo paper and more make this $149 printer a bargain. But read the review for the whole story.
HiTi
HiTi 630 PS Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
Dedicated 4x6 photo printers are a category we haven't devoted much coverage to, but these printers are perfect solutions for people wanting "just push the button" ease of use for printing their digicam images. (Actually *print* your photos, and avoid the "digital black hole effect", as my wife calls it.) Newsletter Editor Mike Pasini took a look at the HiTi 630PS printer recently, and found a lot to like about it. You may too.
HiTi 640 PS Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (June 2003)
The just-released 640PS updates the 630PS's card reader to handle CompactFlash, SmartMedia, Secure Digital, Memory Stick, MultiMedia Card and IBM's MicroDrives. The space-age design has been updated from the "air-conditioner" look of the 630PS to a gun-metal blue with a huggably curvey design that's just 6mm wider. The new card reader is one reason the price has increased to $299.99, but you also get a bump in speed and resolution.
HiTi 730 PS Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (February 2004)
We've reviewed two dye sub printers from Hi-Touch Imaging Technologies already because we were impressed with their revolutionary approach. Not only are they high-quality dye subs rather than finicky inkjets -- but they don't need no stinkin' computer neither. But with the 730PS, Hi-Touch has revolutionized paper size, too. Read on for the revolution!
Kodak
Kodak EasyShare Print Dock 500 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini (December 2005)
How about an EasyShare 4x6 printer for everyone who doesn't own a Kodak digicam? The 500 is the most accommodating 4x6 dye sub we've seen, with an 8-in-1 card reader, PictBridge compatibility, USB-to-computer cabling and WiFi connections. The large 3.5-inch LCD is a big help, too. You don't need a Kodak digicam to enjoy EasyShare printing with the 500. Read our review on the Kodak EasyShare 500 for the whole story.
Kodak EasyShare Print Dock 6000 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
A nifty dye-sublimation printer that makes beautiful 4x6 prints virtually indistinguishable from conventional photographs. A built-in dock fits Kodak CX/DX6000 and LS600-series EasyShare cameras, providing super-simple computer connection, battery recharging (rechargeable batteries for the cameras are included with the printer dock), not to mention totally brainless/painless photo printing. If you have a compatible EasyShare printer (or are planning to buy one), this printer deserves a close look.
Kodak Personal Picture Maker 200 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
Up to 1200x1200 dpi, 6 color process for smooth gradations; Kodak Color Rich technology for brilliant color; built in CompactFlash and SmartMedia card slots for standalone operation; USB interface supports Zip drive connection for printing and image storage.
Olympus
Olympus Camedia P-400 Photo Printer
by Mike Pasini
314 dpi resolution, continuous-tone pixels (no "dithering"); 16.7 million colors (8 bits per color), 7.68 megapixel print engine resolution; 90-second printing speed; Cropping, Frame, Background, and Stamp functions; Prints up to 50 copies at a time.












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