Dave's Picks

12 - 14.9 megapixel

Most Popular 12 - 14.9 Megapixel Cameras

Camera Name Res Lens Avg. Price
Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 digital camera image Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 24.3 3.13x $780.75
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Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera image Fujifilm X-T1 16.3 3.06x $1,649.31
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Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II digital camera image Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II 13.1 5.00x $799.00
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Olympus Stylus 1 digital camera image Olympus Stylus 1 12.0 10.70x $686.40
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Canon EOS 5D Mark III digital camera image Canon EOS 5D Mark III 22.3 -- $3,269.44
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Sony Alpha SLT-A58 digital camera image Sony Alpha SLT-A58 20.1 3.06x $474.46
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Olympus OM-D E-M10 digital camera image Olympus OM-D E-M10 16.1 3.00x $814.68
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Canon EOS Rebel T5i (EOS 700D) digital camera image Canon EOS Rebel T5i (EOS 700D) 18.0 3.06x $771.77
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 digital camera image Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 16.0 3.00x $947.99
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Canon EOS 6D digital camera image Canon EOS 6D 20.2 4.38x $2,556.24
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Top Choices Res Lens Avg. Price
image of Canon EOS Rebel T3 (EOS 1100D) digital camera Canon EOS Rebel T3 (EOS 1100D) 12.2 3.00x $599.99
Canon's new entry-level Rebel adds the latest must-have features, yet still manages an even lower pricetag
A little under three years ago, we reviewed Canon's Rebel XS SLR, and while we found some quirks that might lead enthusiasts to look elsewhere, we felt it to be a pretty well-rounded design, when the entry-level pricetag was factored into the equation. Although the Rebel XS is still available at a discount until the remaining stock is sold through, the Canon T3 is essentially a replacement for that camera, and as such marks the new entry-level point to the company's SLR lineup. On paper, it's an interesting design, with a mixture of significant upgrades in some areas, and features that have been pared back in others. Based around a newer 12-megapixel image sensor and DIGIC 4 image processor, the Canon EOS Rebel T3 offers up a very worthwhile expansion in its upper sensitivity limit, which now tops out at a useful ISO 6,400 equivalent. It also adds two more focus points, and switches to Canon's clever dual-layer iFCL metering chip, which takes account of color information when determining exposure variables. Canon has also slightly increased the T3's LCD display size, added high definition video capture capability, and updated the kit lens to provide an even more effective stabilization system. With a pricetag some $100 below that of its predecessor at launch, though, something had to give. While the Canon T3 has a new optical viewfinder, it actually has just slightly lower magnification and a significantly tighter dioptric correction range than that of its predecessor. Burst shooting speed is also towards the lower end of the range, compared to its main competitors--and that's in JPEG mode. Switch to RAW or RAW+JPEG shooting, and the burst speed and depth is low indeed. In addition, Canon has removed the mechanical portion of its EOS Integrated Cleaning System, leaving the T3 reliant solely on antistatic coatings and software mapping to combat the adverse effects of dust on image quality. To find out whether one hand gave more than the other took away--and whether the Rebel T3's aggressive pricing makes it easy to overlook the occasional shortcoming--you'll want to read our Canon T3 review. (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot G1 X digital camera Canon PowerShot G1 X 14.3 4.00x $649.19
Large-sensor image quality in a compact, zoom body
Every once in a while, a camera comes along which offers a genuinely different approach to its rivals. Some--like the first mirrorless models--go on to fundamentally change the market. Others aren't quite so successful. Either way, we welcome designs that think outside the box. The PowerShot G1 X is Canon's first large-sensor compact. Its announcement last Spring prompted much speculation: was this Canon's final answer to that blossoming mirrorless market, or a first tentative step towards its own mirrorless debut? The fixed-lens design and narrower-aspect ratio have allowed Canon to create a large-sensor PowerShot with a worthwhile size advantage over mirrorless models, and a night-and-day image quality advantage over small-sensor cameras. Like many first-gen products, the G1 X does show a few rough edges though. Will the advantages of its unusual design outweigh the drawbacks? For the verdict, read our Canon G1 X review! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II digital camera Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II 13.1 5.00x $799.00
Canon's flagship large-sensor PowerShot goes sleeker, faster and brighter
Canon refreshes its large-sensor compact with a revised 1.5-inch-type sensor, faster DIGIC 6 image processor, and a brighter f/2-3.9 lens that's also both wider and longer: 24-120mm in 35mm equivalence. With a sleeker shape, add-on EVF and grip, and built-in Wi-Fi with NFC, Canon's flagship PowerShot G1 X Mark II aims to be the versatile do-everything, go-anywhere compact camera for the advanced and enthusiast photographer. While some of the issues with the initial model have been fixed -- more versatile lens, faster processor and closer macro shooting -- there are still some issues here and there. Do the upsides outweigh the downsides? Click here for our Canon G1 X Mark II review! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot G15 digital camera Canon PowerShot G15 12.1 5.00x $405.66
A major step forward for Canon's flagship premium compact
Canon's PowerShot G-series cameras were some of the first premium compact cameras to really grab the attention of the professional photographer and the amateur shooter alike. With the PowerShot G15, Canon takes a huge step forward by incorporating a fast 5x optical zoom lens with a maximum aperture that ranges from f/1.8 at wide to f/2.8 at tele. The camera also boasts a 12-megapixel, 1/1.7-inch CMOS sensor to produce sharper images and full 1080p HD video recording (finally). And at the heart of the Canon G15 resides a ton of advanced photographic controls, including RAW image capture. One significant downgrade from its predecessor, the G12, however, is Canon's decision to replace the articulating LCD monitor with a fixed one, ostensibly to slim the G15's dimensions. Click here for our final verdict on the Canon G15! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot G16 digital camera Canon PowerShot G16 12.1 5.00x $502.92
A boost of speed and connectivity for Canon's flagship premium compact
Canon's PowerShot G-series cameras have been extremely popular with both pro photographers and amateur shooters alike thanks to lots of manual controls, customizable settings and buttons and, last but not least, great image quality. With the PowerShot G16, the big story is speed: fast AF, fast continuous shooting and now Full HD video at up to 60p thanks to its new DIGIC 6 processor. While the sensor has the same 12-megapixel resolution, it is now backside illuminated for better high ISO performance. The G16 also includes built-in Wi-Fi, and a number of other new features and enhancements. Otherwise, the Canon G16 shares many of the same specs as the G15, such as the same f/1.8-2.8 5x optical zoom lens, excellent macro mode and non-articulating LCD monitor. Click here for our Canon G16 review! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot SX260 HS digital camera Canon PowerShot SX260 HS 12.1 20.00x $349.99
High-quality travel zoom appeals to enthusiasts and novices alike
There's nothing like a pocket travel zoom digital camera when you want to get creative shot on vacation. The PowerShot SX260 HS is Canon's best attempt yet at meeting the needs of both the point-and-shooter and the enthusiast photographer, regardless of the destination. Its 20x zoom has great optical quality, and combined with its 12-megapixel sensor the Canon SX260's image quality is good enough to output a 16 x 20-inch print! What with the built-in GPS, we wish it had a little better battery life, but overall the Canon SX260 is looking pretty good. Click here for our Canon SX260 HS review! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot SX50 HS digital camera Canon PowerShot SX50 HS 12.1 50.00x $403.56
Superzoom, super pictures, super simple to use
Canon has outdone itself once again. Boasting a whopping 50x optical zoom range (24-1200mm equivalent) and excellent image quality for its class, the Canon SX50 may not only be the company's finest megazoom offering to date, but also the best megazoom we've ever tested. Improved image stabilization and advanced features such as RAW capture vault it over its predecessor, though it does suffer some of the same expected shortcomings, including poor low-light autofocus performance and fuzzy images at ISO 800 and above. Learn more by reading our in-depth Canon SX50 review here, or buy one right now! (minimize)

image of Fujifilm XF1 digital camera Fujifilm XF1 12.0 4.00x $219.95
With dangerous good looks and serious skills, this enthusiast compact shoots to thrill
Sleek, retro-styled and a little dangerous looking, the Fuji XF1 may just be the James Bond of enthusiast pocket cameras. With its compact size, quality build and luxurious feel, the XF1 just begs to be used. The slick 4x optical zoom lens (with a f/1.8 max aperture!) is of the manual variety, and when you twist it open, the camera turns on ready for action. The Fuji XF1 borrows the same 12-megapixel, 2/3-inch-type EXR CMOS sensor from the X10, as well as the unique EXR shooting modes that go with it that increase its low-light capabilities and dynamic range. Overall, it's a fast and fun shooter with a ton of customizability that should appeal to enthusiasts, while its good looks make it an object of desire for gadget geeks and fashionistas alike. Check out our Fuji XF1 review for in-depth details on its performance and image quality, or shop for one right now. (minimize)

image of Nikon Coolpix P7700 digital camera Nikon Coolpix P7700 12.2 7.10x $496.95
Revamped flagship enthusiast digicam scores big on design and image quality
It's taken three tries but Nikon has finally produced a flagship Coolpix camera that stacks up favorably to its top competitors, boasting an upgraded 12-megapixel sensor and a fast 7.1x zoom lens with a maximum aperture of f/2.0. Nikon removed the optical viewfinder from the Coolpix P7700, but we actually see this as a plus, especially since the 3-inch vari-angle LCD screen is easy to view and allows you to compose in tight spots. Sans viewfinder, the Nikon P7700's design is more compact, comfy and classic than its predecessor. Ultimately, it comes down to image quality and the P7700 delivers sharp still images and Full HD videos -- with just a few quirks -- and produces large, high-quality prints at lower ISOs. Click here for our review of the Nikon P7700, or click this link to shop! (minimize)

image of Nikon D300S digital camera Nikon D300S 12.3 -- $1,463.47
An extremely capable SLR gets even better
More of an evolutionary upgrade to the D300, the Nikon D300S sports a faster frame rate, dual-media capability, and HD video capability. While the Nikon D300S has the same 12.3-megapixel sensor as its predecessor, it can now capture up to 7.1 frames per second, which increases to 8 frames per second with the optional battery grip. The new SD/SDHC slot gives the Nikon D300S greater versatility, and it still has a Type I CompactFlash slot to work with the more traditional professional standard. But the big story with the Nikon D300S digital camera is its HD movie mode, capable of capturing 1,280 x 720 pixel videos at 24 frames per second. Though it has a built-in monaural microphone for audio recording, the Nikon D300S also includes a stereo mic-in jack for higher quality recording than was offered with the Nikon D90. Users can frame images via the big, beautiful optical viewfinder or the large, high-resolution LCD in Live view mode, and they can view their images and videos direct from the camera thanks to the Nikon D300S's HDMI-out port. The Nikon D300S is an impressive digital camera. Click here for our full review of the Nikon D300S. (minimize)

image of Nikon D700 digital camera Nikon D700 12.1 -- $2,999.95
The price of full-frame digital SLR excellence just went down a notch
With a design and features that will attract a wide array of photographers, the Nikon D700 is the first full-frame digital SLR camera to break the $3,000 barrier at its introduction. Based on the popular Nikon D300, the Nikon D700's controls are poised for quick activation, with commonly used functions out in plain sight, rather than buried in a menu. The Nikon D700's full-frame sensor is essentially identical to the Nikon D3's, so image quality is superb, and high-ISO performance is unprecedented, ranging from 100 to 25,600. A large, high-resolution LCD screen serves up images that are sharper than normal, and menus likewise appear razor-sharp. Special features adorn the Nikon D700, including a 51-point autofocus system, Active D-Lighting image processing, Lateral chromatic aberration correction, Vignette control, and AF Fine-tune capability; all making the camera extremely adaptable. Nikon's latest offering is a great digital SLR camera to build a system around. Click here for our review of the full-frame Nikon D700 (minimize)

image of Nikon D90 digital camera Nikon D90 12.3 5.80x $1,079.00
Nikon's flagship prosumer SLR model is the first SLR capable of video recording, but that's just one of its many exceptional features!
Nikon rocked the DSLR world when they introduced their D90 SLR early this Fall, the first SLR that can record movies. Its video capabilities won't replace dedicated camcorders, but will provide welcome relief for photographers tired of carrying along a pocket digicam just for taking "video snapshots". Its movie recording is only one of the many exceptional features the Nikon D90 has to offer. It also incorporates the chromatic aberration correction capability first introduced in the D3 and D300 high-end models. This feature works regardless of the brand lens you're using, so the D90 promises to improve the quality of most any lens you use it with. Speaking of lenses, the Nikon D90 ships with one of the nicest kit lenses we've seen yet, a 18-105mm VR (vibration reduction, Nikon's name for Image Stabilization) model that delivers very good sharpness, and (thanks to the aforementioned CA-reduction capability of the camera) very little chromatic aberration. The Nikon D90 brings much, much more to the table, though, far more than we can go into here. If you're in the market for a high-end prosumer digital SLR camera, the Nikon D90 deserves to be near the top of your list for consideration. Read our Nikon D90 review for all the details! (minimize)

image of Olympus Stylus 1 digital camera Olympus Stylus 1 12.0 10.70x $686.40
A new class of enthusiast long-zoom compacts is born
We've seen bridge cameras and long zooms for less money, even one with a constant f/2.8 aperture (the Panasonic FZ200) but most all have come with 1/2.3" sensors at their core. The Olympus Stylus 1 comes with the 1/1.7" sensor and the difference in image quality and low light performance is significant. And while the sensor is less than half the surface area of the acclaimed Sony RX10 bridge camera, the Stylus 1 is much smaller and much more affordable, putting it in a class by itself. Want to learn more? Read our Olympus Stylus 1 review for all the details, or buy one now! (minimize)

image of Olympus Stylus XZ-2 digital camera Olympus Stylus XZ-2 12.0 4.00x $588.49
Same serious lens but new serious upgrades for serious photographers
With the Olympus XZ-2, the company upgrades its top-of-the-line enthusiast compact camera with a new 12-megapixel 1/1.7-inch CMOS sensor, but thankfully keeps its predecessor's fast and bright f/1.8-2.5 iZUIKO 4x zoom lens. We found the pairing of these features helps the XZ-2 produce great images for its class, especially at low ISOs. Add in a new 3-inch articulating LCD touchscreen, fast-and-accurate autofocus, a nifty dual-purpose front control ring, and a ton of advanced photographic features such as PASM controls and RAW capture, and the Olympus XZ-2 makes for a near-ideal, albeit pricey, everyday or back-up camera for serious photographers. Find out more in our in-depth Olympus XZ-2 review or buy one now! (minimize)

image of Olympus Tough TG-2 digital camera Olympus Tough TG-2 12.0 4.00x $379.99
A waterproof model made for enthusiasts wanting solid controls and customizability
There's a good reason why the Olympus TG-2 is also called Tough; its rugged, element-defying skills are among the best for compact waterproof cameras. The TG-2 also proved a tough act to beat when it comes to controls and customizability, being the only waterproof compact we tested that had a physical Mode dial, providing serious shooters quick access for getting the perfect exposure. And that's suiting since the TG-2 tended to underexpose in Auto mode. But that doesn't mean it takes bad pictures; in fact it printed as well or better than its rivals including 16-megapixel models, and its fast f/2 max aperture at wide angle really helps in low-light situations. Overall, the Olympus TG-2 stands out as one of the best in its class. Check out our 2013 Best Waterproof Cameras shootout for our Olympus TG-2 review. (minimize)

image of Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 digital camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 12.1 24.00x $573.19
A superzoom camera with a super bright lens
Panasonic pumped some new excitement into its acclaimed superzoom line when it paired a Leica-branded f2/.8 lens with the Panasonic FZ200. That's a constant f/2.8 max aperture across the entire 24x optical zoom range, which is a rarity among long zooms these days and -- teamed with the camera's excellent AF system -- it proved to perform well in low-light and high shutter speed situations. There's a lot more to like about the FZ200, including a 12 fps, high-res burst mode and Full HD 1080p video recording (at up to 60 fps!). And advanced photographic controls such as manual exposure and focusing, as well as RAW image capture, mean it's a viable alternative for enthusiasts wanting a lightweight, everyday alternative to a heavy, bulky DSLR with multiple zoom lenses (at least in good light), and a serious step up for beginners wanting more zoom range. The FZ200's relatively small sensor does force some compromises on image quality (like almost every other camera in its class), but the camera's convenience and versatility make it one of the best superzooms on the market. Read our Panasonic FZ200 review for more details, or buy one here. (minimize)

image of Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF5 digital camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF5 12.1 3.00x $749.00
Really fast autofocus in a compact body you won't leave at home
Back in mid-2011, Panasonic launched its tiny Lumix GF3, nicely demonstrating the size advantage of mirrorless over SLR cameras. This year's Panasonic GF5 takes that design and swaps in an improved sensor, faster image processor, higher-resolution touch screen display, and a raft of other tweaks. Key among the changes for us has to be the Panasonic GF5's improved autofocus performance: the GF3 was already fairly fast by mirrorless camera standards, but the Panasonic Lumix GF5 goes a step further, besting many consumer DSLRs. Panasonic has also updated its touchscreen user interface, finally allowing almost overlay-free image framing and reducing distraction. Do these and other changes take a good consumer camera and make it great? And are the advantages of the GF5 enough for more experienced photographers to overlook the lack of a viewfinder and flash connectivity? Read our Panasonic GF5 review, and find out! (minimize)

image of Pentax MX-1 digital camera Pentax MX-1 12.0 4.00x $335.32
Retro-styled premium compact gets by on much more than its good looks
Boasting top-notch build quality and retro-styled design, the Pentax MX-1 enthusiast compact combines timeless styling with modern niceties such as a tilting LCD screen, fast 4x optical zoom lens, RAW still image capture and Full HD movie recording. Though the 1/1.7-inch imaging sensor might not produce photos that rival those from larger sensor cameras, the image quality from the MX-1 -- especially at lower ISOs -- remains quite pleasing. It's a great compact backup for serious photographers, and a serious step-up for advanced beginners. But is it the right model for you? Read our Pentax MX-1 review to find out! Or shop for one now! (minimize)

image of Samsung EX2F digital camera Samsung EX2F 12.4 3.30x $499.99
A superfast (f/1.4) lens and advanced controls premium compact camera
Serious photographers are always looking for new options for a premium compact camera they can easily carry around with them in situations when it's too much hassle to lug a DSLR. The Samsung EX2F is a new entrant that stacks up well against many of the best cameras in its class, thanks in large part to its f/1.4 Schneider-Kreuznach lens that's among the fastest digicam lenses on the market. The 12-megapixel EX2F boasts advanced photographic controls, including the ability to shoot RAW files (which we highly recommend with this model), a 3-inch articulated AMOLED display and built-in WiFi that make it an all-around solid performer. We've got a few quibbles with it, namely inconsistent JPEG capture, but we think it's a good alternative to the usual suspects, especially if you shoot a lot in low lighting. Click here for our review of the Samsung EX2F, or click the link to shop! (minimize)

image of Sigma DP1 Merrill digital camera Sigma DP1 Merrill 14.8 1.00x $759.00
Single-minded compact camera takes luscious low-ISO stills
The Sigma DP1 Merrill marks a significant upgrade over its predecessor, the DP1x, and delivers some of the most beautiful, detailed images at low ISOs that we've ever seen from a camera in its price range. Paired with a sharp 28mm-equivalent lens, the DP1M's 46-megapixel, three-layered Foveon sensor captures images that demonstrate remarkable per-pixel sharpness and an extra-special dimensionality that has created an almost cult following of Foveon faithful. However, the compact camera bears some significant shortcomings, as the DP1M's image quality drops off quickly at higher ISOs and its performance, usability and flexibility trail well behind the competitors. Read our in-depth Sigma DP1 Merrill review to see if its stunning images outweigh its sacrifices. (minimize)

 
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