Dave's Picks

Mid-size

Most Popular Mid-size Cameras

Camera Name Res Lens Avg. Price
Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 digital camera image Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 24.3 3.13x $748.00
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Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera image Fujifilm X-T1 16.3 3.06x $1,649.23
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Olympus Stylus 1 digital camera image Olympus Stylus 1 12.0 10.70x $666.65
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Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II digital camera image Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II 13.1 5.00x $726.00
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Olympus OM-D E-M10 digital camera image Olympus OM-D E-M10 16.1 3.00x $784.12
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 digital camera image Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 16.0 3.00x $848.32
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Pentax K-3 digital camera image Pentax K-3 24.4 7.50x $1,135.30
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Canon PowerShot G16 digital camera image Canon PowerShot G16 12.1 5.00x $505.16
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Samsung NX300 digital camera image Samsung NX300 20.3 3.06x $799.99
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Fujifilm X100S digital camera image Fujifilm X100S 16.3 1.00x $1,192.33
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Editor's Choice Res Lens Avg. Price
image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 digital camera Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 24.3 1.00x $2,565.00
Full-frame image quality and a great lens in an astonishingly small package Full-frame sensors have always meant the highest image quality in handheld cameras, but they've also always meant big, bulky, heavy cameras. The Sony RX1 breaks this mold, though, and not just by a little bit. It's hard to convey just how small the Cyber-shot RX1 is without actually handing you one to hold yourself. It's not much bigger than some high-end digicams, and the same size or smaller than some models in Sony's excellent NEX line of Compact System Cameras when you include one of the kit lenses with the latter. The 24 megapixel full-frame sensor is the same as used in Sony's flagship A99 SLT camera, and it's paired with a 35mm f/2 Carl Zeiss lens with T* optical coatings and superb corner to corner sharpness. The combined package is perfect for "street photography" aficionados, or anyone wanting ultimate optical and sensor quality in a super-portable, beautiful little camera. With an introductory price of $2,800, it clearly won't be the camera for everyone, but even at that price, we think it'll be one of Sony's most popular models. If you're looking for ultimate quality in a "pocket" camera, the Sony RX1 defines the state of the art. (minimize)

image of Olympus PEN E-P5 digital camera Olympus PEN E-P5 16.1 1.00x $1,333.17
The mightiest PEN so far delivers blazing fast performance and excellent pictures The Olympus E-P5 is the company's best PEN-series Micro Four Thirds camera yet, taking the best of its predecessor, the E-P3, and many features from the acclaimed OM-D E-M5, and adding a few new wrinkles of its own. Key upgrades include 5-axis image stabilization, a 1/8000s top shutter speed, an improved touchscreen LCD and increased ISO range. It also boasts a stylish retro design and plenty of physical buttons for accessing settings directly. Overall, this flagship mirrorless model delivers blazing fast autofocus, burst shooting near 10fps and exceptional image quality -- even at higher ISOs -- that rival the performance of many top enthusiast DSLRs. Read our in-depth Olympus E-P5 review for more info, or buy one right now! (minimize)

image of Nikon Coolpix A digital camera Nikon Coolpix A 16.2 1.00x $1,029.95
With the Nikon Coolpix A, the large-sensor, fixed prime lens camera finally goes mainstream Nikon's Coolpix compact camera line finally has its first large-sensor model, thanks to the debut of the Nikon Coolpix A. It's the company's first entry into the burgeoning large-sensor, fixed prime lens market, and the category's first offering from a mainstream brand. As of its announcement it was also the smallest and lightest by a fair margin, and tied for the most affordable. While it's since been bested in those areas by the Ricoh GR, it's still a very compact camera, especially when you consider that it's packed in a large APS-C image sensor and a bright f/2.8 wide-angle lens. But is it just a niche model, or can the Coolpix A appeal to a broader demographic? And how does its image quality compare to interchangeable-lens models? Read our Nikon Coolpix A review, and find out! (minimize)

Other Top Choices Res Lens Avg. Price
image of Canon EOS M digital camera Canon EOS M 18.0 3.10x $494.47
A bargain mirrorless camera for Canon DSLR owners and beginners
Thanks to a recent firmware update that improves its autofocusing speed, the 18-megapixel, APS-C-sensored Canon EOS M is a much better mirrorless camera now than it was when announced a year ago. Today, it's also much cheaper and stands as a relative bargain to its close cousins, the Rebel T4i and T5i DSLRs, delivering similar (good!) image quality in a much more compact package. The EOS M also possesses some serious video skills, including the ability to record Full HD (1080p) movies and to change aperture, shutter speed and more while filming in manual mode. Though it has its flaws, the camera could be a good investment for Canon DSLR owners wanting a smaller second body -- and who can mount their existing lenses using an accessory adapter -- as well as for beginners wanting to step up from a point-and-shoot. Read our in-depth Canon EOS M review to find out if this mirrorless model is right for you! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot G1 X digital camera Canon PowerShot G1 X 14.3 4.00x $577.24
Large-sensor image quality in a compact, zoom body
Every once in a while, a camera comes along which offers a genuinely different approach to its rivals. Some--like the first mirrorless models--go on to fundamentally change the market. Others aren't quite so successful. Either way, we welcome designs that think outside the box. The PowerShot G1 X is Canon's first large-sensor compact. Its announcement last Spring prompted much speculation: was this Canon's final answer to that blossoming mirrorless market, or a first tentative step towards its own mirrorless debut? The fixed-lens design and narrower-aspect ratio have allowed Canon to create a large-sensor PowerShot with a worthwhile size advantage over mirrorless models, and a night-and-day image quality advantage over small-sensor cameras. Like many first-gen products, the G1 X does show a few rough edges though. Will the advantages of its unusual design outweigh the drawbacks? For the verdict, read our Canon G1 X review! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II digital camera Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II 13.1 5.00x $726.00
Canon's flagship large-sensor PowerShot goes sleeker, faster and brighter
Canon refreshes its large-sensor compact with a revised 1.5-inch-type sensor, faster DIGIC 6 image processor, and a brighter f/2-3.9 lens that's also both wider and longer: 24-120mm in 35mm equivalence. With a sleeker shape, add-on EVF and grip, and built-in Wi-Fi with NFC, Canon's flagship PowerShot G1 X Mark II aims to be the versatile do-everything, go-anywhere compact camera for the advanced and enthusiast photographer. While some of the issues with the initial model have been fixed -- more versatile lens, faster processor and closer macro shooting -- there are still some issues here and there. Do the upsides outweigh the downsides? Click here for our Canon G1 X Mark II review! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot G15 digital camera Canon PowerShot G15 12.1 5.00x $411.74
A major step forward for Canon's flagship premium compact
Canon's PowerShot G-series cameras were some of the first premium compact cameras to really grab the attention of the professional photographer and the amateur shooter alike. With the PowerShot G15, Canon takes a huge step forward by incorporating a fast 5x optical zoom lens with a maximum aperture that ranges from f/1.8 at wide to f/2.8 at tele. The camera also boasts a 12-megapixel, 1/1.7-inch CMOS sensor to produce sharper images and full 1080p HD video recording (finally). And at the heart of the Canon G15 resides a ton of advanced photographic controls, including RAW image capture. One significant downgrade from its predecessor, the G12, however, is Canon's decision to replace the articulating LCD monitor with a fixed one, ostensibly to slim the G15's dimensions. Click here for our final verdict on the Canon G15! (minimize)

image of Canon PowerShot G16 digital camera Canon PowerShot G16 12.1 5.00x $505.16
A boost of speed and connectivity for Canon's flagship premium compact
Canon's PowerShot G-series cameras have been extremely popular with both pro photographers and amateur shooters alike thanks to lots of manual controls, customizable settings and buttons and, last but not least, great image quality. With the PowerShot G16, the big story is speed: fast AF, fast continuous shooting and now Full HD video at up to 60p thanks to its new DIGIC 6 processor. While the sensor has the same 12-megapixel resolution, it is now backside illuminated for better high ISO performance. The G16 also includes built-in Wi-Fi, and a number of other new features and enhancements. Otherwise, the Canon G16 shares many of the same specs as the G15, such as the same f/1.8-2.8 5x optical zoom lens, excellent macro mode and non-articulating LCD monitor. Click here for our Canon G16 review! (minimize)

image of Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera Fujifilm X-T1 16.3 3.06x $1,649.23
The Fuji X-T1 wraps cutting-edge technology in a deliciously-retro body, including a class-leading viewfinder and seriously impressive image quality
The Fuji X-T1 is a great example of the retro genre. Don't let its surprisingly compact, vintage-styled body fool you, though: It's wrapped around cutting-edge technology, including a class-leading electronic viewfinder and Fuji's exclusive X-Trans sensor technology. The Fuji X-T1 also boasts blazing-fast performance and top-notch image quality, but is it the right camera for you? We roamed the continents in search of our answer. Read our in-depth Fuji X-T1 review, and find out if it's finally time to shelve your DSLR and join the mirrorless crowd! (minimize)

image of Fujifilm X100S digital camera Fujifilm X100S 16.3 1.00x $1,192.33
A powerful photographic tool for advanced shooters with patience
The Fuji X100S rangefinder-style camera takes a leap forward with its new 16.3-megapixel X-Trans CMOS II sensor that helps it deliver stellar images with low noise, high dynamic range, good color and improved resolution. Overall, its performance bests that of its popular predecessor, the X100, with speedier operation and faster autofocus in good light, thanks to the addition of on-chip phase-detect pixels to create its new hybrid AF system. However, in many ways, the Fuji X100S didn't turn out to be as big an upgrade as we had hoped, with its low-light, contrast-detect AF performance still sluggish and inaccurate in real-life situations, and its video capabilities hampered by moire and the lack of image stabilization. Still, the Fuji X100S can be a great camera for the right shooter, especially street and landscape photographers, delivering Leica-like feel and quality in a more affordable package. For more info, check out our in-depth Fuji X100S review, or buy one now! (minimize)

image of Leica X Vario (Typ 107) digital camera Leica X Vario (Typ 107) 16.2 2.55x $2,206.49
Luxury compact zoom for those willing to pay a premium for form, function and fantastic images
The Leica X Vario proved to be more than just an X2 with a fixed-lens zoom, and certainly adds up to more than the sum of its parts. The camera's body design and controls drip with precision engineering, making it a complete joy to hold and shoot. Though the 28-70mm equivalent Vario-Elmar zoom lens may not be the brightest in the world -- providing max. apertures of just f/3.5-6.4 -- it's nonetheless incredibly sharp corner-to-corner. Combine the lens with an excellent 16.2 megapixel, APS-C sensor and nimble processor, and the X Vario delivers tremendous image quality with incredibly accurate colors, with its high ISO results featuring a pleasing film-like grain. This model may be one of the least expensive "Made in Germany" Leica cameras, but it's still a pricey proposition at US$2,850, making it a luxury compact for a photographer willing to pay a premium for form, function and fantastic photos. Read our Leica X Vario review to see if it's worth your investment! (Or buy one now!) (minimize)

image of Nikon Coolpix P7700 digital camera Nikon Coolpix P7700 12.2 7.10x $496.95
Revamped flagship enthusiast digicam scores big on design and image quality
It's taken three tries but Nikon has finally produced a flagship Coolpix camera that stacks up favorably to its top competitors, boasting an upgraded 12-megapixel sensor and a fast 7.1x zoom lens with a maximum aperture of f/2.0. Nikon removed the optical viewfinder from the Coolpix P7700, but we actually see this as a plus, especially since the 3-inch vari-angle LCD screen is easy to view and allows you to compose in tight spots. Sans viewfinder, the Nikon P7700's design is more compact, comfy and classic than its predecessor. Ultimately, it comes down to image quality and the P7700 delivers sharp still images and Full HD videos -- with just a few quirks -- and produces large, high-quality prints at lower ISOs. Click here for our review of the Nikon P7700, or click this link to shop! (minimize)

image of Olympus OM-D E-M10 digital camera Olympus OM-D E-M10 16.1 3.00x $784.12
High-end features, performance and affordability come together in this versatile mirrorless camera.
Olympus combines the enthusiast-oriented E-M5 and professional E-M1 cameras into the lightweight and affordable Olympus E-M10. With the E-M1's powerful image processor, a similar AA-filterless sensor and the E-M5's compact design, the E-M10 manages to bring impressive class-leading image quality, dynamic range, and excellent high ISO performance in a lightweight design down to an entry-level price point. With improved HD video quality, built-in Wi-Fi and a raft of customizable functions, dials and buttons, the E-M10 is great for entry-level shooters and enthusiasts alike. Click here for our Olympus E-M10 review! (minimize)

image of Olympus PEN E-PM2 digital camera Olympus PEN E-PM2 16.1 3.00x $499.99
Surprisingly sophisticated step up from point-and-shoot cameras
Like its big brother -- the PEN E-PL5 -- the Olympus E-PM2 captures stunning, detailed images, thanks to the 16-megapixel sensor it borrows from the top-rated Olympus E-M5. However, the E-PM2 is smaller, lighter and less expensive than the E-PL5, and it relies primarily on touchscreen controls that make it an ideal option for photographers transitioning from point-and-shoots into a compact, interchangeable-lens camera system. The lack of a physical Mode dial and dedicated settings buttons may be a turn off to some enthusiasts, however, the PEN E-PM2 still offers an impressive variety of advanced photographic capabilities that surpasses what some higher-end DSLRs and CSCs can offer. Though a little lacking in action AF and video recording performance, the Olympus E-PM2 mainly overcomes its limitations by delivering fantastic image quality at such an affordable price. Read our in-depth Olympus E-PM2 review for more details, or buy one here. (minimize)

image of Olympus Stylus 1 digital camera Olympus Stylus 1 12.0 10.70x $666.65
A new class of enthusiast long-zoom compacts is born
We've seen bridge cameras and long zooms for less money, even one with a constant f/2.8 aperture (the Panasonic FZ200) but most all have come with 1/2.3" sensors at their core. The Olympus Stylus 1 comes with the 1/1.7" sensor and the difference in image quality and low light performance is significant. And while the sensor is less than half the surface area of the acclaimed Sony RX10 bridge camera, the Stylus 1 is much smaller and much more affordable, putting it in a class by itself. Want to learn more? Read our Olympus Stylus 1 review for all the details, or buy one now! (minimize)

image of Olympus Stylus XZ-2 digital camera Olympus Stylus XZ-2 12.0 4.00x $438.87
Same serious lens but new serious upgrades for serious photographers
With the Olympus XZ-2, the company upgrades its top-of-the-line enthusiast compact camera with a new 12-megapixel 1/1.7-inch CMOS sensor, but thankfully keeps its predecessor's fast and bright f/1.8-2.5 iZUIKO 4x zoom lens. We found the pairing of these features helps the XZ-2 produce great images for its class, especially at low ISOs. Add in a new 3-inch articulating LCD touchscreen, fast-and-accurate autofocus, a nifty dual-purpose front control ring, and a ton of advanced photographic features such as PASM controls and RAW capture, and the Olympus XZ-2 makes for a near-ideal, albeit pricey, everyday or back-up camera for serious photographers. Find out more in our in-depth Olympus XZ-2 review or buy one now! (minimize)

image of Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 digital camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 16.0 3.00x $848.32
A dream camera for savvy shooters that hits the sweet spot of size, features and performance
The Panasonic GX7 may just be the Micro Four Thirds model we've all been waiting for, offering a ton of advanced features -- including a tilting electronic viewfinder, touchscreen LCD and robust Wi-Fi capabilities -- while capturing very good still images and great video. It may not rank the best in any one specific area, but the GX7 is the rare compact system camera that doesn't sacrifice much either, delivering all-around great performance for a reasonable price. It hits a sweet spot that should surely appeal to both pros looking for a compact, everyday alternative to their bulky DSLRs as well as a smart and sophisticated step-up model for amateur shooters. Read our in-depth Panasonic GX7 review for all the details, or shop for one now! (minimize)

image of Pentax K-3 digital camera Pentax K-3 24.4 7.50x $1,135.30
With groundbreaking technology in a compact, weather-sealed body, the Pentax K-3 puts forth a strong argument for ditching Canon and Nikon
Ricoh's flagship APS-C camera, the 24-megapixel Pentax K-3 is jam-packed with clever technology, yet it's also affordably priced and among the very smallest enthusiast DSLRs. As well as overhauled imaging, autofocus, and metering, it also boasts an industry-first system that lets you choose whether resolution or moir�-resistance are more critical for any given shot. But can its unique advantages tempt you away from mainstream rivals Canon and Nikon? (And should you upgrade, if you're already a Pentaxian?) Read our Pentax K-3 review, and find out! (minimize)

image of Pentax MX-1 digital camera Pentax MX-1 12.0 4.00x $379.26
Retro-styled premium compact gets by on much more than its good looks
Boasting top-notch build quality and retro-styled design, the Pentax MX-1 enthusiast compact combines timeless styling with modern niceties such as a tilting LCD screen, fast 4x optical zoom lens, RAW still image capture and Full HD movie recording. Though the 1/1.7-inch imaging sensor might not produce photos that rival those from larger sensor cameras, the image quality from the MX-1 -- especially at lower ISOs -- remains quite pleasing. It's a great compact backup for serious photographers, and a serious step-up for advanced beginners. But is it the right model for you? Read our Pentax MX-1 review to find out! Or shop for one now! (minimize)

image of Samsung NX300 digital camera Samsung NX300 20.3 3.06x $799.99
Affordably-priced, retro-meets-modern mirrorless camera shoots great photos, shares them wirelessly
The 20.3-megapixel Samsung NX300 is the most fully realized mirrorless, compact system camera the company has produced yet, and one of the best on the market in its class. Though the NX300 is slightly bigger and heavier than its predecessors, its "retro modern" design looks great, and it's still highly portable. Its brand-new APS-C sized, CMOS image sensor forgoes a pack-in-more-pixels upgrade in favor of better image quality and on-chip phase detection autofocus, allowing a quicker and more accurate Hybrid AF system. The NX300 also adds a larger, sharper display, and makes it both tiltable for versatility, and touch-sensitive for ease-of-use. The NX300 is also a faster performer than previous models, and sports improved wireless connectivity that helps put your photos on your smartphone. Read our Samsung NX300 review for more on this affordable, comprehensively-upgraded compact system camera! (minimize)

image of Sigma DP1 Merrill digital camera Sigma DP1 Merrill 14.8 1.00x $732.69
Single-minded compact camera takes luscious low-ISO stills
The Sigma DP1 Merrill marks a significant upgrade over its predecessor, the DP1x, and delivers some of the most beautiful, detailed images at low ISOs that we've ever seen from a camera in its price range. Paired with a sharp 28mm-equivalent lens, the DP1M's 46-megapixel, three-layered Foveon sensor captures images that demonstrate remarkable per-pixel sharpness and an extra-special dimensionality that has created an almost cult following of Foveon faithful. However, the compact camera bears some significant shortcomings, as the DP1M's image quality drops off quickly at higher ISOs and its performance, usability and flexibility trail well behind the competitors. Read our in-depth Sigma DP1 Merrill review to see if its stunning images outweigh its sacrifices. (minimize)

image of Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 digital camera Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 24.3 3.13x $748.00
The Sony A6000 is affordable, fast, and takes really great pictures. Could this be the ultimate all-rounder camera?
Not only does this high-res speed demon cram in plenty of desirable features, the Sony A6000 also shaves a couple of hundred dollars off its predecessor's price. That's the recipe for greatness, so it's no surprise this has been one of our most popular reviews in recent memory -- and now, it's finished! So what was our final verdict on this affordable, swift-shooting camera, and is it time you bought one for yourself? Read our in-depth Sony A6000 review, and see what we thought! (minimize)

image of Sony Alpha ILCE-A7 digital camera Sony Alpha ILCE-A7 24.3 2.50x $1,998.24
Good news: The best full-frame mirrorless camera may also be the most affordable!
When we reviewed Sony's A7R mirrorless camera, we were thrilled by its combination of a full-frame image sensor and a compact body. The Sony A7 offers both, and yet it's even more affordable. It also boasts better autofocus and performance, but trades off some of its sibling's epic resolution to achieve these. We already knew the Sony A7 would be great, but we wanted to answer which was better: The Sony A7 or A7R? Does amazing image quality trump performance? Are you better off spending a little more, or can you be thrifty and still get the best full-frame mirrorless camera money can buy? Read our Sony A7 review and find out! (minimize)

image of Sony Alpha ILCE-A7R digital camera Sony Alpha ILCE-A7R 36.4 -- $2,218.09
Our 2013 Camera of the Year marks the start of the full-frame mirrorless revolution
The news you've been waiting for has arrived! The age of the fully-featured, full-frame mirrorless camera is finally here -- and boy, what a duo of cameras kickstart the revolution. The Sony A7R promises absolutely amazing image quality in a compact body, while its closely-related sibling the A7 trades a little resolution for greater performance. Both cameras excite in their own way, but it's the Sony A7R -- our 2013 Camera of the Year -- which really floors us. This amazing compact system camera offers image quality to rival a medium format design, yet in a body that can fit in a coat pocket, even with a lens attached. Travel and street photographers in particular should have the Sony A7R at the top of their wishlist. Read our in-depth Sony A7R review for all the details, or shop for one now! (minimize)

image of Sony Alpha NEX-3N digital camera Sony Alpha NEX-3N 16.1 3.13x $376.27
Easy-to-use compact system camera gives beginners a terrific bang for their buck, and great images to boot
For photographers looking to step-up from a point-and-shoot to an interchangeable lens system camera, the Sony NEX-3N does it as seamlessly as any entry-level model we've ever tested. It employs a simple but effective user interface, and even places a zoom lever right on the camera body. What's more, the NEX-3N takes great photos that rival those from higher-end mirrorless cameras, and even some DSLRs, thanks to its relatively large APS-C-sized sensor. While experienced photographers may focus on the camera's limitations, and might only consider it as a compact backup, beginning shooters will love how easy the NEX-3N is to use, how fun and fast it is to shoot with, and how much bang for the buck it delivers. Read our in-depth Sony NEX-3N review for more details or go buy one now! (minimize)

image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 digital camera Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 20.2 8.33x $1,044.99
This weather-sealed beauty sports a lens that will change your mind about fixed-lens cameras
Conventional wisdom says that if you want the best pictures, you want interchangeable lenses. The Sony RX10 turns that theory on its head, substituting the interchangeable lenses for just the one fixed lens -- but what a great optic it is! With a bright f/2.8 aperture and a generous 24-200mm equivalent range, you'd need a lot of bulky, expensive glass to match the RX10's lens on your SLR or CSC. The RX10 also has a huge advantage over its bridge camera rivals, thanks to a much larger sensor, and it debuts some interesting features including full-sensor readout for video capture. Is it pricey? Sure, but we think it's worth it. This could just be the camera which convinces you that interchangeable lenses are overkill! Read our in-depth Sony RX10 review for all the details, or shop for one now! (minimize)

image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R digital camera Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R 24.3 1.00x $2,591.22
For photographers wanting the ultimate resolution in a compact camera at (almost) any price
Sony achieves the seemingly impossible with the Sony RX1R in surpassing the resolving power of its award-winning, full-frame RX1 compact camera by removing the optical low-pass filter and tweaking the JPEG processing. Most of the gains are found in the RX1R's JPEG images, with RAW files showing only the slightest improvements in sharpness and detail. Photographers who choose the Sony RX1R over its near twin will have to weigh these advantages over the new model's increased risk for moire and aliasing. But since the RX1R is available at the same price, it's a risk many might find worth taking. Read our Sony RX1R review for more details or buy one now! (minimize)

 
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