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Sports Cameras
Most Popular
This Week
image of Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 digital camera

Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000
24.3 megapixels, 3.13x
Check Prices: $398.00
image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III digital camera

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III
20.2 megapixels, 2.92x
Check Prices: $798.00
image of Nikon D7200 digital camera

Nikon D7200
24.2 megapixels, 7.78x
Check Prices: $1,096.95

Dave's Picks


Most Popular Sports Cameras

Camera Name Res Lens Avg. Price
Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 digital camera image Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 24.3 3.13x $398.00
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Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III digital camera image Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III 20.2 2.92x $798.00
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Nikon D7200 digital camera image Nikon D7200 24.2 7.78x $1,096.95
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Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II digital camera image Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II 20.2 8.33x $1,298.00
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Canon EOS 70D digital camera image Canon EOS 70D 20.2 7.50x $899.00
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Canon EOS 7D Mark II digital camera image Canon EOS 7D Mark II 20.2 7.50x $1,299.00
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 digital camera image Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 20.1 16.00x $747.99
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Olympus OM-D E-M5 II digital camera image Olympus OM-D E-M5 II 16.1 -- $897.00
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Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II digital camera image Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II 20.2 3.60x $548.00
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Canon EOS 7D digital camera image Canon EOS 7D 18.0 3.80x $1,299.00
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Editor's Choice Res Lens Avg. Price
image of Olympus OM-D E-M5 digital camera Olympus OM-D E-M5 16.1 4.20x $449.00
Old and new come together in one high-quality digital camera Small and light, yet solid and weather-sealed, the Olympus OM-D E-M5 is a lot more capable than its size suggests. Image quality is noticeably improved from past Olympus offerings, rivaling that of APS-C SLRs, and its sensor-shift image stabilization system is the most advanced we've seen. Perhaps most importantly, though, the Olympus E-M5 is a whole lot of fun to use, and the ready availability of great glass adds to the party, making you want to get out and shoot. We also love the E-M5's nostalgic appearance, as well as how it feels and operates when we're out shooting. The whole experience is impressive. Click here for our Olympus E-M5 Review! (minimize)

image of Sony Alpha SLT-A99 digital camera Sony Alpha SLT-A99 24.3 -- $1,998.00
Sony delivers a no-excuses full-frame SLR breakthrough Sony's been trying to crack the pro SLR market for years, but with relatively little success till now. With the Sony Alpha SLT-A99, though, it looks like they finally have a winner: It's a blazingly fast shooter, yet delivers 24 megapixels of resolution, while Sony's unique translucent-mirror technology means it can focus rapidly, continuously, and accurately, whether shooting videos or rapid-fire bursts of stills. It's also the only full-frame camera with very effective sensor-based image stabilization built in, providing IS benefits regardless of what lens is attached. The list of the Sony A99's features goes on and on, including a unique range-sensitive AF mode, a super-resolution EVF, built-in GPS, and a rugged magnesium-alloy frame with full weather sealing that's both smaller and lighter than most other high-end full-frame SLRs on the market. If you're looking for a true professional-grade full-frame SLR with unparalleled continuous AF capability, great shooting speed, and a price literally half those of its nearest competitors, look no further than the Sony A99. It offers truly ground-breaking capabilities at a price sure to shake up the pro camera marketplace. (minimize)

image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 digital camera Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 20.2 3.60x $448.00
Sony RX100 takes the premium pocket camera crown! We were so impressed with the Sony RX100's specs, we had to rush and give it a complete review in a hurry to see if it truly measured up. We were not disappointed. The Sony RX100's 1-inch-type, 20.2-megapixel sensor, f/1.8, 3.6x lens, and small body combine to create a new pocket digital camera benchmark. Sony didn't skimp on special features for amateurs or enthusiasts, either. Click here to see our Sony RX100 review! (minimize)

Other Top Choices Res Lens Avg. Price
image of Canon EOS 70D digital camera Canon EOS 70D 20.2 7.50x $899.00
Innovative AF system makes this DSLR a videographer's dream come true -- at an affordable price
The long-awaited Canon 70D comes packed with a groundbreaking new technology -- Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS AF system -- that provides on-chip phase detection autofocus at every single pixel. That means a DSLR can finally record video with full-time continuous AF that's truly camcorder-like, with smooth racking and exceptional subject tracking. And Live View AF feels almost as fast as traditional viewfinder shooting. The 70D also gets an upgrade to 20.2 megapixels of resolution, as well as compelling Wi-Fi features that include remote image capture with full exposure controls. The camera may not wow enthusiasts looking for significantly better still image quality, but the 70D marks a serious step up for photographers wanting pro-level video performance and quality. Check out our in-depth Canon 70D review for all the details, or buy one now from IR affiliates Adorama or B&H! (minimize)

image of Canon EOS 7D digital camera Canon EOS 7D 18.0 3.80x $1,299.00
One digital SLR that pretty much does it all
The Canon EOS 7D stands alone. It's a digital SLR camera that can capture 18-megapixel images at 8 frames per second and 14-bit depth, with a quite usable ISO range from 100 to 12,800. The Canon 7D offers Live View, full manual exposure control while recording movies, Full HD movie recording, a new 19-point, all-cross-type autofocus system, a near-100% optical viewfinder, and built-in support for controlling up to three groups of Speedlite strobes. You can choose from one or two of those items with other cameras from Canon and other manufacturers, but if you want it all in one body, the Canon 7D is your only choice at any price. Printed quality is nothing short of astonishing, with great looking images up to 24x36 inches. That you can get it all for $1,699 is pretty amazing. Click here to read our review of the Canon 7D. (minimize)

image of Canon EOS 7D Mark II digital camera Canon EOS 7D Mark II 20.2 7.50x $1,299.00
Five years later, the Canon 7D Mark II brings a solid array of upgrades and new features to Canon's flagship APS-C DSLR.
Five years after the original 7D debuted, the Mark II version is here, and with it, a host of upgrades and new features. Catering primarily to sports, action and wildlife photographers, the Canon 7D Mark II , borrows many features and performance specs from their 1D-series models, but at a more affordable price. The 7D Mark II looks to continue this heritage with an even more flexible and powerful 65-pt. AF system, Dual DIGIC 6 processors, Dual Pixel CMOS AF, improved build quality and more advanced video features. The Canon 7D Mark II is a big upgrade over the 7D in many ways, though the Mark II does falter in a few areas. Read our in-depth Canon 7D Mark II review for more! (minimize)

image of Canon EOS-1D X digital camera Canon EOS-1D X 18.1 -- $4,599.00
Canon's new flagship full-frame pro SLR is the one to beat
Canon's curious move paid off, that of merging the 1D and 1Ds lines into one camera that captures very high-res images at a blistering frame rate. While it's not the highest resolution on the pro market, the Canon 1D X really impresses with its high ISO performance, and its 12-frame-per-second burst mode will keep up with athletic events, enabled by its dual DIGIC 5+ processors. Lock up the mirror and you can almost shoot 18-megapixel movies at 14 frames per second. Yet its 18-megapixel resolution is nothing to sneeze at, serving quite well for professional fashion and portrait work. Its 61-point autofocus system covers a good portion of the viewfinder, and includes five high-precision diagonal cross-type points for greater precision with fast lenses, also meeting the needs of the press photographer working in low light. Big and formidable, the Canon 1D X is very much made for pros, and its rugged build is as equal to the job as its impressive image quality. Easily one of the finest cameras on the market, the Canon 1D X is a sure Dave's Pick. (minimize)

image of Fujifilm X-Pro1 digital camera Fujifilm X-Pro1 16.3 -- $799.00
A retro look, great features and stunning image quality make the Fujifilm X-Pro1 a real winner
Quality prime lenses and a tack-sharp sensor come together with a unique hybrid optical viewfinder to form the Fujfilm X-Pro1, a digital camera built exclusively for enthusiast photographers. The X-Pro1 really hits the nail on the head, driving deep into high-ISO territory with tack-sharp images. Its controls and feature set are also ideal for the target market, and its available lenses are reasonably priced, small, well-made, and light weight. We found it to be a terrific photographic tool, easy to control, and a joy to use. Click here for our review of the Fujfilm X-Pro1, or just take our word for it and shop for the Fujfilm X-Pro1 now! (minimize)

image of Nikon D4S digital camera Nikon D4S 16.2 -- $5,996.95
The Nikon D4S is a supremely swift shooter with "Pro" written all over it -- but can it dethrone the D4?
There are no two ways about it: The Nikon D4S is one seriously impressive DSLR. That's to be expected, bearing in mind its heritage. But casting judgement on its greatness depends very much on perspective, so we looked at Nikon's new pro flagship through two different lenses: That of the enthusiast looking to step up their game, and that of the pro upgrading to the latest and greatest. Whichever camp you fall into, we've got your answer. Read our Nikon D4S review, and find out if it's time you bought yourself a new DSLR! (minimize)

image of Nikon D7200 digital camera Nikon D7200 24.2 7.78x $1,096.95
It's a good time to be a Nikonian: The weather-sealed, enthusiast-grade Nikon D7200 is here, and this DSLR is better than ever

When we reviewed it a couple of years ago, Nikon's D7100 enthusiast DSLR thrilled us in almost every way, but a too-small buffer left us wanting just a little more. Now the followup Nikon D7200 is here, and this all-weather beauty no longer keeps us waiting thanks to a tripling of the buffer memory. And that's not all: There are some handy upgrades in other areas, too. But with the push to mirrorless, can the D7200 still capture our hearts in 2015? Find out now in our in-depth Nikon D7200 review!


image of Olympus OM-D E-M1 digital camera Olympus OM-D E-M1 16.1 -- $949.00
The mightiest Micro Four Thirds camera so far delivers stunning stills and top-of-class performance
The Olympus E-M1 builds upon the Micro Four Thirds legacy of the outstanding OM-D E-M5, adding not only a ton of features geared for pros and advanced enthusiasts, but also an on-chip, phase-detect autofocusing system that works remarkably well with Olympus Four Thirds DSLR lenses. The OM-D E-M1 offers a solid, weatherproof build, an outstanding electronic viewfinder, tons of physical controls and an advanced Wi-Fi system. Most importantly, the camera delivers excellent image quality for its class, even at high ISOs, as well as blazing performance that rivals top DSLRs. Check out our Olympus E-M1 review to see who we think should buy this camera! (minimize)

image of Olympus OM-D E-M5 II digital camera Olympus OM-D E-M5 II 16.1 -- $897.00
Packed with features and yet surprisingly compact, the Olympus E-M5 II could be the best Micro Four Thirds camera yet!
A follow-up to the first Micro Four Thirds OM-D series camera, the Olympus E-M5 II has a tough act to follow. Absolutely bursting at the seams with the latest technology -- including a unique high resolution mode that takes it far beyond what its sensor should be capable of -- this 16-megapixel shooter doesn't disappoint. We think this could be the best argument yet for the Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera. Find out why in our in-depth Olympus E-M5 II review! (minimize)

image of Olympus PEN E-P5 digital camera Olympus PEN E-P5 16.1 1.00x $799.00
The mightiest PEN so far delivers blazing fast performance and excellent pictures
The Olympus E-P5 is the company's best PEN-series Micro Four Thirds camera yet, taking the best of its predecessor, the E-P3, and many features from the acclaimed OM-D E-M5, and adding a few new wrinkles of its own. Key upgrades include 5-axis image stabilization, a 1/8000s top shutter speed, an improved touchscreen LCD and increased ISO range. It also boasts a stylish retro design and plenty of physical buttons for accessing settings directly. Overall, this flagship mirrorless model delivers blazing fast autofocus, burst shooting near 10fps and exceptional image quality -- even at higher ISOs -- that rival the performance of many top enthusiast DSLRs. Read our in-depth Olympus E-P5 review for more info, or buy one right now! (minimize)

image of Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 digital camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 20.1 16.00x $747.99
The Panasonic FZ1000 makes it clear: You don't need that bulky bag full of lenses to get great photos in almost any situation!
In 2013, the Sony RX10 set a very high benchmark for just what a long-zoom camera could be, with a large 1"-type image sensor and generous 8.3x zoom lens. Now, Panasonic puts forth a spectacularly-capable challenger in the 16x zoom Panasonic FZ1000, and despite the same sensor size and an even more generous feature set, it's barely any bigger. Although it lacks the constant aperture of the Sony, we think the Panasonic FZ1000 represents an even better buy for the typical photographer in search of a camera that will free them from the need to juggle a dozen different lenses. Want to know why? Read our in-depth Panasonic FZ1000 review, and find out! (minimize)

image of Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 digital camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 12.1 24.00x $359.00
A superzoom camera with a super bright lens
Panasonic pumped some new excitement into its acclaimed superzoom line when it paired a Leica-branded f2/.8 lens with the Panasonic FZ200. That's a constant f/2.8 max aperture across the entire 24x optical zoom range, which is a rarity among long zooms these days and -- teamed with the camera's excellent AF system -- it proved to perform well in low-light and high shutter speed situations. There's a lot more to like about the FZ200, including a 12 fps, high-res burst mode and Full HD 1080p video recording (at up to 60 fps!). And advanced photographic controls such as manual exposure and focusing, as well as RAW image capture, mean it's a viable alternative for enthusiasts wanting a lightweight, everyday alternative to a heavy, bulky DSLR with multiple zoom lenses (at least in good light), and a serious step up for beginners wanting more zoom range. The FZ200's relatively small sensor does force some compromises on image quality (like almost every other camera in its class), but the camera's convenience and versatility make it one of the best superzooms on the market. Read our Panasonic FZ200 review for more details, or buy one here. (minimize)

image of Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 digital camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 16.0 3.00x $497.00
A dream camera for savvy shooters that hits the sweet spot of size, features and performance
The Panasonic GX7 may just be the Micro Four Thirds model we've all been waiting for, offering a ton of advanced features -- including a tilting electronic viewfinder, touchscreen LCD and robust Wi-Fi capabilities -- while capturing very good still images and great video. It may not rank the best in any one specific area, but the GX7 is the rare compact system camera that doesn't sacrifice much either, delivering all-around great performance for a reasonable price. It hits a sweet spot that should surely appeal to both pros looking for a compact, everyday alternative to their bulky DSLRs as well as a smart and sophisticated step-up model for amateur shooters. Read our in-depth Panasonic GX7 review for all the details, or shop for one now! (minimize)

image of Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 digital camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 10.1 3.80x $383.92
A serious photographer's digital camera in a small package
Panasonic's deluxe pocket digital camera line has long been a favorite of photographers as a capable, small take-everywhere camera, when lugging their pro camera was too much to ask. Improved in several ways, the Panasonic LX7 digital camera is a joy to shoot. Key refinements that will appeal to photographers include a manual aperture ring, a manual focus toggle, and a faster, high quality lens. As we've come to expect from Lumix digital cameras, the LX7 also has rock-solid image stabilization, and the new level gauge helps straighten your horizons. Optical quality stands out as the major enhancement, which gave us the confidence to place key subjects in corners without worry that they'd be too soft. The new faster lens -- a full stop faster -- allows faster shutter speeds in low light, and delivers fairly nice bokeh as well. We enjoyed shooting with the Lumix LX7, and felt comfortable with it as our only digital camera on several outings. Click here to see our review of the Panasonic LX7, or just follow our shopping link to find the best price. (minimize)

image of Pentax K-3 digital camera Pentax K-3 24.4 7.50x $624.95
With groundbreaking technology in a compact, weather-sealed body, the Pentax K-3 puts forth a strong argument for ditching Canon and Nikon
Ricoh's flagship APS-C camera, the 24-megapixel Pentax K-3 is jam-packed with clever technology, yet it's also affordably priced and among the very smallest enthusiast DSLRs. As well as overhauled imaging, autofocus, and metering, it also boasts an industry-first system that lets you choose whether resolution or moir�-resistance are more critical for any given shot. But can its unique advantages tempt you away from mainstream rivals Canon and Nikon? (And should you upgrade, if you're already a Pentaxian?) Read our Pentax K-3 review, and find out! (minimize)

image of Samsung NX1 digital camera Samsung NX1 28.2 3.13x $1,097.99
A professional-level, high-performance, 4K-shooting NX-series camera
The NX1 is the first pro-level NX-series camera, and Samsung has pulled out all the stops with an impressive set of features and under-the-hood horsepower. On most fronts, the Samsung NX1 is a tremendous camera, with excellent DSLR-like ergonomics and controls, impressive photo and video quality and great performance. The NX1 does falter somewhat with continuous autofocus performance, but overall, it is a very compelling camera. Read more about Samsung's flagship NX camera in our in-depth Samsung NX1 review! (minimize)

image of Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 digital camera Sony Alpha ILCE-A6000 24.3 3.13x $398.00
The Sony A6000 is affordable, fast, and takes really great pictures. Could this be the ultimate all-rounder camera?
Not only does this high-res speed demon cram in plenty of desirable features, the Sony A6000 also shaves a couple of hundred dollars off its predecessor's price. That's the recipe for greatness, so it's no surprise this has been one of our most popular reviews in recent memory -- and now, it's finished! So what was our final verdict on this affordable, swift-shooting camera, and is it time you bought one for yourself? Read our in-depth Sony A6000 review, and see what we thought! (minimize)

image of Sony Alpha SLT-A77 digital camera Sony Alpha SLT-A77 24.3 3.13x $559.95
Pro-camera burst performance and full-time AF in a camera that enthusiasts can afford
With the Alpha SLT-A77, Sony makes a bold step into pro camera territory by combining an extremely high-res 24 megapixel APS-C image sensor, a speedy Bionz image processor, and its phase detect-friendly Translucent Mirror design. The result? A camera that can shoot at up to an astounding twelve full-resolution frames per second, while still adjusting focus between frames. The Sony A77 also boasts a go-anywhere weather-sealed design, and yet still manages to include a versatile tilting LCD monitor, something not offered by its nearest rivals. Add built-in GPS and Full HD, 60 frames-per-second video with full-time phase detect autofocus, and you've got quite a camera on your hands. Whether you're a sports shooter, an enthusiastic videographer, or you've just got hyperactive kids to keep up with the Sony Alpha A77 should prove more than up to the task. All that at a price tag that an enthusiast can justify makes the Sony A77 an easy Dave's Pick. Click here for our review of the Sony A77, or click this link to shop! (minimize)

image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 digital camera Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 20.2 8.33x $898.00
This weather-sealed beauty sports a lens that will change your mind about fixed-lens cameras
Conventional wisdom says that if you want the best pictures, you want interchangeable lenses. The Sony RX10 turns that theory on its head, substituting the interchangeable lenses for just the one fixed lens -- but what a great optic it is! With a bright f/2.8 aperture and a generous 24-200mm equivalent range, you'd need a lot of bulky, expensive glass to match the RX10's lens on your SLR or CSC. The RX10 also has a huge advantage over its bridge camera rivals, thanks to a much larger sensor, and it debuts some interesting features including full-sensor readout for video capture. Is it pricey? Sure, but we think it's worth it. This could just be the camera which convinces you that interchangeable lenses are overkill! Read our in-depth Sony RX10 review for all the details, or shop for one now! (minimize)

image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II digital camera Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II 20.2 8.33x $1,298.00
Do you really need bulky interchangeable lenses? Not if the spectacular enthusiast long-zoom Sony RX10 II has anything to say about it!
Two years after its predecessor invented the large-sensor, long-zoom category, the Sony RX10 II is here to take things to the next level. It aims to replace your bulky interchangeable-lens camera with a veritable Swiss Army knife compendium of photographic features in a beautifully-crafted body. But the RX10 II is no longer in a class of one, and there's no getting around the fact that it is much more expensive than its rivals. Does it have what it takes to justify that extra expense? Find out now in our in-depth Sony RX10 II review! (minimize)

image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II digital camera Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II 20.2 3.60x $548.00
The best pocket camera gets even better
We've put it through its paces, and the Sony RX100 II really sets a new bar for pocket camera performance. The original RX100 already dominated the competition, and the new model is a substantial step up from it in a number of areas. The RX100 II adds a tilting rear LCD, built-in Wi-Fi, and a multi-interface shoe (a flash hot shoe with an internal connector for attaching things like a high-quality external EVF or a microphone). The biggest change, though, is a switch to a backside-illuminated Exmor R CMOS sensor. This improved high-ISO/low-light JPEG performance by more than a full stop in our tests, albeit a bit less so in the RAW files. (Sony's done quite a bit to improve their JPEG processing lately.) Looking for the best pocket camera on the market? You need to check out the Sony RX100 II! (minimize)

image of Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III digital camera Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III 20.2 2.92x $798.00
The Sony RX100 III is a stunning, pocket-friendly shooter, but can it defeat its amazingly popular siblings?
It was clear from its heritage that the Sony RX100 III would be an exciting camera, given that both its predecessors earned our Pocket Camera of the Year award, two years running. But that level of success also meant some mighty big shoes to fill. Sony's pocket-friendly shooter line are in a class of their own, and we shot all three models side-by-side to determine once and for all -- which is the best compact camera that money can buy? Did the RX100 III have what it took to steal the crown? Read our Sony RX100 III review, and find out! (minimize)

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