• APS-C 332.3mm2
  • 18.0 megapixels
  • ISO 100 - 12,800
  • APS-C 332.3mm2
  • 18.0 megapixels
  • ISO 100 - 12,800

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Comparison Review

The essential equation to understand this matchup is:

Canon T4i - grip problem + lens upgrade = Canon T5i

Read on for more:

A little while after release of the Canon T4i, reports emerged that some grips turned white and could cause mild allergic reactions. Canon traced the problem to a type of zinc present in the rubber of some grips. Rather than fix the issue with the T4i and keep the model name, Canon distanced itself from the T4i by replacing it with a new but nearly identical model, the T5i.

If you find a T4i on fire sale and don't mind the potential grip issue (it only affected some T4i cameras), it might be a viable choice. There really are precious few improvements in the T5i over the T4i and bargains are always nice.

The chief benefit to the T5i is the new 18-55mm STM kit lens, with an advanced stepping motor that significantly improves autofocus speed. Other than that, you'd be hard pressed to spot a difference beyond minor features like support for real-time display of creative filter effects in live-view mode.

Let's be honest though: the decision is pretty easy: buy the T5i. The cameras are nearly identical, but the T5i gives you an AF boost thanks to the kit lens and peace of mind that you won't end up with the white-grip-of-allergic-reaction.

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Differences

Canon T4i advantages over Canon T5i

  • More kit lens zoom
    7.5x vs 3.1x
    Zooming is easier than walking

Canon T5i advantages over Canon T4i

  • Lighter weight
    791g vs 1039g
    Lighter weight

Similarities

Common Strengths

  • Tilt-swivel screen
    Both provide
    Tilt and swivel the screen for maximum shooting flexibility
  • Touchscreen
    Both provide
    Select your focus point more intuitively.
  • Eye-level viewfinder
    Both provide
    You'll be able to frame photos even when the sun is out
  • On-sensor phase detect
    Both provide
    Usually improves live view and video AF performance
  • External Mic Jack
    Both provide
    Improved sound fidelity when shooting video
  • HDMI out
    Both provide
    Use an external screen to monitor or review video
  • Hot shoe
    Both provide
    Off-camera flashes open new possibilities
  • Internal flash
    Both provide
    Useful in a pinch for fill flash
  • Bulb shutter
    Both provide
    Hold the shutter open manually for long exposures

Common Weaknesses

  • Focus peaking
    Neither provide
    Your camera will highlight what's in focus
  • NFC
    Neither provide
    Simplifies pairing your camera with supported phones
  • In-camera panoramas
    Neither provide
    Stitches multiple shots into a panoramic photo
  • In-Camera Image Stabilization
    Neither provide
    Reduces the effects of camera shake at slower shutter speeds
  • Wi-Fi
    Neither provide
    Share your photos wirelessly
  • GPS
    Neither provide
    Geotag your photos
  • Top deck display
    Neither provide
    Check settings with a screen on top of the camera
  • Headphone jack
    Neither provide
    Monitor audio recording while you shoot video
  • Dual card slots
    Neither provide
    Gives you more storage flexibility
  • Pentaprism viewfinder
    Neither provide
    Much better viewfinder picture fidelity
  • Slow-motion videos
    Neither provide
    Shoot slow-motion videos

User reviews

The Competition

Compared to Pentax K-30

Canon T4i
Pentax K-30
  • $650
  • APS-C
  • Tilt-swivel screen
  • Fast startup
  • $499
  • APS-C
  • Less expensive
  • Focus peaking
Canon T5i
Pentax K-30
  • $630
  • APS-C
  • Tilt-swivel screen
  • Fast startup
  • $499
  • APS-C
  • Less expensive
  • Focus peaking

Compared to Pentax K-5 II

Canon T4i
Pentax K-5 II
  • $650
  • APS-C
  • Tilt-swivel screen
  • Less expensive
  • $752
  • APS-C
  • Larger sensor
  • In-Camera Image Stabilization
Canon T5i
Pentax K-5 II
  • $630
  • APS-C
  • Tilt-swivel screen
  • Less expensive
  • $752
  • APS-C
  • Larger sensor
  • In-Camera Image Stabilization

Compared to Nikon D5200

Canon T4i
Nikon D5200
  • $650
  • APS-C
  • Touchscreen
  • On-sensor phase detect
  • $564
  • APS-C
  • Less expensive
  • Larger sensor
Canon T5i
Nikon D5200
  • $630
  • APS-C
  • Touchscreen
  • On-sensor phase detect
  • $564
  • APS-C
  • Less expensive
  • Larger sensor

Compared to Pentax K-500

Canon T4i
Pentax K-500
  • $650
  • APS-C
  • Tilt-swivel screen
  • Touchscreen
  • $514
  • APS-C
  • Focus peaking
  • Larger sensor
Canon T5i
Pentax K-500
  • $630
  • APS-C
  • Tilt-swivel screen
  • Touchscreen
  • $514
  • APS-C
  • Focus peaking
  • Larger sensor

Compared to Canon 70D

Canon T4i
Canon 70D
  • $650
  • APS-C
  • Less expensive
  • $970
  • APS-C
  • Wi-Fi
  • Higher effective ISO
Canon T5i
Canon 70D
  • $630
  • APS-C
  • Less expensive
  • Lighter weight
  • $970
  • APS-C
  • Wi-Fi
  • Higher effective ISO

Review Excerpt

  • Excellent image quality; 9 cross-type AF points; Stereo microphones; Built-in touchscreen; Multi-shot modes.

  • Slow Live View and video autofocus; High ISO performance is unimproved; Below-average battery life; No dedicated AF illuminator.

  • Excellent image quality; 9 cross-type AF points; Stereo microphones; Built-in touchscreen; Multi-shot modes; Improved kit lens; Even more affordable.

  • Little-changed from the earlier T4i; Slow Live View and video autofocus; High ISO performance is unimproved; Below-average battery life; No dedicated AF illuminator.

Canon T4i vs Canon T5i Discussion

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