Basic Specifications
Full model name: Fujifilm X-E4
Resolution: 26.10 Megapixels
Sensor size: APS-C
(23.5mm x 15.6mm)
Kit Lens: n/a
Viewfinder: EVF / LCD
Native ISO: 160 - 12,800
Extended ISO: 80 - 51,200
Shutter: 1/32000 - 900 sec
Dimensions: 4.8 x 2.9 x 1.3 in.
(121 x 73 x 33 mm)
Weight: 12.5 oz (354 g)
includes batteries
MSRP: $850
Availability: 03/2021
Manufacturer: Fujifilm
Full specs: Fujifilm X-E4 specifications

Your purchases support this site

Buy the Fujifilm X-E4
26.10
Megapixels
Fujifilm X APS-C
size sensor
image of Fujifilm X-E4
Front side of Fujifilm X-E4 digital camera Front side of Fujifilm X-E4 digital camera Front side of Fujifilm X-E4 digital camera Front side of Fujifilm X-E4 digital camera Front side of Fujifilm X-E4 digital camera

Fujifilm X-E4 Review -- Now Shooting!

by William Brawley and Jeremy Gray
Preview posted: 01/27/2021
Updated: 04/28/2021

Updates:
03/12/2021: First Shots added
04/28/2021: Field Test and Gallery Images added

Click here to jump to our in-depth Fuji X-E4 Product Overview.

 

Fujifilm X-E4 Field Test

The X-E4 sacrifices usability for compactness but delivers solid all-around performance

by Jeremy Gray | Posted 04/27/2021

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/2000s, ISO 640.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The Fujifilm X-E4 is a compact rangefinder-style interchangeable lens mirrorless camera with an APS-C image sensor. As far as X mount cameras go, the X-E4 is particularly small. This comes with a handful of compromises in terms of controls, but the overall usability remains high. Despite its small stature, the X-E4 is a very capable photographic tool. It captures high-quality images and delivers impressive all-around performance.

Fujifilm X-E4 Key Features and Specs

  • Interchangeable lens APS-C mirrorless camera
  • 26.1MP APS-C X-Trans image sensor
  • Native ISO range of 160-12,800, expandable to 80-51,200
  • Quad-core X-Processor 4 image processor
  • 18 Film Simulations
  • Shoots at up to 8 frames per second using the mechanical shutter
  • New shutter mechanism with improved reliability
  • 425-point hybrid autofocus system with phase-detect AF
  • 3-inch tilting touchscreen
  • 0.39-inch OLED EVF with 2.36M dots and 0.62x magnification
  • 4K/30p video with 4:2:2 10-bit external and 4:2:0 8-bit internal recording
  • Full HD video at up to 240 frames per second
  • $850 USD for the body only, also available in a kit with XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens
Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/8, 0.6s, ISO 160.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Fujifilm X-E4 body and design: An attractive camera with some usability compromises

The Fujifilm X-E4 is a great-looking, retro-inspired camera. It is stylish. However, the awesome look does come at some cost as the ergonomics aren't fantastic out of the box. The flat front and back of the camera look good but aren't very comfortable, especially when using a heavier lens. Fortunately, there are optional accessories available, including a front grip attachment and an optional thumb rest. I didn't have access to these for my hands-on time with the X-E4, but I expect they make a positive impact.

The X-E4 is a simple, stylish camera. It looks good. But does it always feel good in use?

Other than the lack of a built-in front grip, there's little to dislike about the design of the X-E4. While I lament the lack of dual command dials, that's not much of an issue when you're using an XF lens with a built-in aperture ring, as you can adjust the aperture on the lens itself. Further, the X-E4 has a dedicated shutter speed dial on the top deck of the camera. There is also a dedicated exposure compensation dial on the top, too. These are old-school inclusions that I like.

There are a pair of small buttons on the top of the X-E4. The 'Q' button brings up a customizable Quick Menu. This button is easy to reach with your thumb. The other button brings up the ISO setting menu by default. You can customize both the Q and Fn buttons to deliver direct access to various settings, including Film Simulation, white balance, focus area, focus mode, face detection AF settings, self-timer, metering mode, and much more.

The top of the X-E4 is well-designed. The included dials work well and provide the camera a retro look.

On the back of the camera, there are six buttons and no directional pad. Instead of a directional pad, there's a small joystick used for menu navigation, and when actively shooting, it's used to move the autofocus point. When you're shooting and move the stick, it brings up the display of autofocus points, and then you can move the stick to select a new autofocus area. The joystick is quite small, so it's not always easy to make precise movements. You can press the joystick in to select, which is convenient when navigating menus.

The back of the X-E4 has very few buttons. Further, unlike the X-E3, the X-E4 doesn't have dual command dials. The area where your thumb rests is quite slippery, but an optional thumb rest is available.

The rear display is 3-inches in size diagonally and has 1.62M dots of resolution, which is a bit higher-res than the prior model's display. Further, the X-E4 now has an articulated touchscreen. It tilts up to act as a selfie screen and tilts down 90° as well. To the top left of the display is a 0.39" OLED EVF with 2.36M dots of resolution, a 100fps refresh rate and 0.62x magnification. The EVF isn't huge, and the eyepiece is a slightly uncomfortable hard plastic material, but it delivers a crisp image and works well in most situations.

The X-E4's tilting touchscreen works well. It can tilt upward 180° and downward nearly 90°.

The battery compartment, due to the overall shape of the camera, is located on the bottom panel. The SD card slot is also here. This means that you must remove an attached tripod plate when you want to take the battery or SD card out. It's a slight inconvenience. There's also no weather-sealing gasket around the battery compartment door, so you must be careful not to set the X-E4 down on a wet surface. Ideally, there would be extensive sealing on the top and bottom of a camera, but that's not the case here.

Overall, the X-E4 is a stylish camera. The ergonomics leave a bit to be desired, but the overall control layout is good. I like the retro-inspired look and the dedicated shutter speed and exposure compensation dials. The tilting touchscreen offers a great articulation range, although it'd be nice if it had a three-way tilt. The EVF is a little small, but the image is sharp and detailed.

Image quality: 26.1MP APS-C X-Trans sensor offers impressive performance

With its 26.1-megapixel X-Trans CMOS image sensor, the X-E4 captures good-quality images. The imaging pipeline is the same as the Fujifilm X-T4, Fujifilm's flagship X camera.

Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/16, 1s, ISO 160.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The X-E4 captures sharp images, especially when you process the camera's RAW files. JPEG images straight from the camera look good too, both in terms of detail and colors. Speaking of colors, one of the best aspects of Fujifilm cameras is their excellent Film Simulations. In the case of the X-E4, there are 18 Film Simulations to choose from, including a variety of monochromatic options. ACROS is a personal favorite of mine, and you'll see many examples of that Film Simulation in this Field Test and our X-E4 Gallery.

Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/8, 1.1s, ISO 80.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

In terms of color accuracy, overall color rendering is pleasing when considering the standard Provia Film Simulation. With that said, reds can be a bit dull. To pump up the color a tad, the Velvia Film Simulation is a solid choice. However, this Film Simulation sometimes offers a bit too much contrast and can crush some fine shadow detail. Ultimately, it's a subjective matter, which is part of why the selection of Film Simulations is so impressive. There's something for everyone.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/9, 1/500s, ISO 640.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

As you increase the ISO, image quality remains impressive. When looking at high ISO JPEG images, the camera does a nice job reducing visible noise without ruining the detail in the photograph. As expected, RAW images have more noise, at first, but by processing the image yourself and applying fine-tuned noise reduction, you can extract a lot of detail from high ISO images shot with the X-E4.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/500s, ISO 12,800.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/500s, ISO 12,800.
100% crop from JPEG image. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/500s, ISO 12,800.
100% crop from RAW image processed with Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Despite having a smaller than full-frame image sensor, you can do a lot of work with the RAW files from the X-E4. The images are highly flexible and allow for considerable adjustments to exposure, shadow and highlights. You can recover a lot of detail from an image without noticeably harming overall image quality and fidelity.

Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/8, 1/6s, ISO 160.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/9, 1/20s, ISO 160.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/11, 1.3s, ISO 80.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Autofocus and performance: Good autofocus in many situations

Much like with image quality, the X-E4 borrows from the X-T4 in the autofocus department as well. The camera offers a wide array of autofocus modes and features, including eye-detect AF and subject tracking.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 123mm (185mm equiv.), f/5, 1/500s, ISO 1600.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

In real-world use, the autofocus system is impressive, at least when using a single point or zone. When tracking moving subjects, the subject tracking mode can occasionally come up a bit short or just lose the subject. However, the camera can deliver great autofocus performance, so long as you're okay following your subject using the dedicated autofocus joystick.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/500s, ISO 400.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The X-E4's autofocus system is not perfect, nor is it as fast as some of the pricier competition, but it's nonetheless a capable AF system. The X-E4 is not the ideal choice for action, but then again, that's not specifically its target audience. Given its compact form factor, the camera is well-suited to being a travel camera, and its autofocus is up to the task.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 289mm (434mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/1000s, ISO 800.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The X-E4 has a UHS-I SD card slot, limiting its performance relative to the faster X-T4, despite having the same sensor and processor. That said, the X-E4 is plenty quick for action situations, given its maximum shooting speed of 8 frames per second. The camera is even quicker when using the electronic shutter, topping out at 20 fps at full resolution and 30 fps in a 1.25x crop mode. However, these speeds aren't quite as practical without great continuous autofocus performance to match. Buffer performance also holds the X-E4 back as an action camera to a significant extent. At 8 fps, the X-E4 can record more than 100 JPEG images, but only around 20 RAW images.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/7.1, 1/2500s, ISO 800.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Overall, the X-E4's autofocus performance is good. While its continuous AF may not be perfect, nor is its continuous shooting performance excellent, the camera is plenty quick for many photographic subjects. You can use the camera for occasional sports photography, and it works well in many wildlife shooting situations, but it's not an area where the camera excels.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 289mm (434mm equiv.), f/6.4, 1/500s, ISO 1000.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 278mm (417mm equiv.), f/6.4, 1/500s, ISO 2000.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/8, 1/2000s, ISO 1600.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Shooting experience

The X-E4 offers a solid shooting experience. However, it's not without its limitations. As I touched on in the handling section earlier, the compact form of the X-E4 is great, but it causes some issues with the overall feel of the X-E4. The camera feels a bit slippery in use, for lack of a better term. Without optional accessories, it's difficult to get a great grip on the X-E4, especially when using a longer lens, like a 70-300mm. Further, the viewfinder isn't that comfortable during extended use. The minimalist style looks great, sure, but isn't always the most comfortable during use.

Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/450s, ISO 160.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 185mm (278mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/500s, ISO 160.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

On the plus side, the touchscreen is great in real-world use. It is my preferred way to interact with the camera's menus and during playback. It's much quicker to zoom in on an image on the display with touch than with buttons and dials, for example, and this same trend applies in other situations.

XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR kit lens

The X-E4 is available as a body-only option and in a kit with Fujifilm's new XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens. The lens is a great pairing with the X-E4 due to its compact form factor and useful 41mm-equivalent focal length.

The XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR is a very short lens. It shown here without the included lens hood, which is also quite short and adds only a small bit of length to the lens.

The XF 27mm f/2.8 lens is less than an inch thick, making it a pancake lens. The ultra-portable combo is easy enough to slip in a jacket pocket, which is an impressive feat for an APS-C interchangeable lens camera. It's a great combo for walking around and grabbing shots.

Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/2.8, 1/1250s, ISO 160.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

In terms of performance, the 27mm f/2.8 is solid. The f/2.8 aperture is reasonably bright and can produce some nice bokeh when you are focused on a close subject. I like that the lens includes a dedicated aperture dial, which makes it great for the X-E4, given that the camera lacks dual command dials. Further, the lens is quite sharp, and its DC motor delivers quick and accurate autofocus.

Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens at 27mm (41mm equiv.), f/8, 1/35s, ISO 160.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

If the X-E4 is your first X Series camera, it's hard to argue against opting for the kit. The lens adds $200 to the upfront cost (the lens is $400, separately, by the way), but it's well worth it for most photographers. The lens feels like a natural pairing with the X-E4.

Video: Pretty impressive video performance

The X-E4 is a solid video camera. The X-E4 can record an oversampled DCI 4K and 4K UHD video at 24 and 30 frames per second, a competitive feature set. The camera records Full HD video at up to 240 fps, which is impressive.

4K video quality is decent, particularly at low ISO settings. Autofocus performance is quite good, although the camera doesn't have subject-tracking AF when recording video. Further, the X-E4 has no in-body image stabilization, limiting those who want to record stable video but don't want to carry a tripod around.

Fujifilm X-E4 4K video compilation - 3840 x 2160 at 29.97 frames per second.
Download edited video (544.7 MB .MP4 File)

In terms of usability, the X-E4 can record 8-bit Log internally and 10-bit Log via micro-HDMI output. The camera has a mic port, and you can use an included USB-C to audio jack adapter to use headphones. Given its performance and features, the X-E4 is a nice choice for recording video.

Fujifilm X-E4 Field Test Summary

Compact APS-C camera with impressive image quality

What I like most about the X-E4

  • Compact design
  • Good touchscreen
  • Impressive image quality
  • Great companion camera
  • Pretty good video performance
Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/7.1, 1/2500s, ISO 800.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

What I dislike about the X-E4

  • The minimalist design looks good but compromises in terms of usability
  • The X-E4 is a bit slippery in use without optional accessories
  • Continuous autofocus performance leaves a bit to be desired
  • No in-body image stabilization

The Fujifilm X-E4 is a good camera. It's compact, lightweight and stylish. The minimalist design does include drawbacks in terms of usability. The camera is easy to use in most cases, although the lack of physical controls can slow you down in some situations.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/320s, ISO 500.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The X-E4 is a capable photographic tool. Its image quality is impressive, and you can do a lot with the camera's RAW image files. Further, Fujifilm's Film Simulations are excellent, making it easy to get great-looking shots in-camera.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 91mm (137mm equiv.), f/8, 1/3s, ISO 160.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Overall, the Fujifilm X-E4 is fun to use, looks great and captures high-quality photos and videos.

Fujifilm XF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens at 300mm (450mm equiv.), f/5.6, 1/2000s, ISO 500.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

 

• • •

 

Fujifilm X-E4 Product Overview

by William Brawley

Much like how the X-T4 answered the call for, essentially, a "Fuji X-T3 with in-body image stabilization," the just-announced Fujifilm X-E4 is, more or less, an interchangeable lens version of the Fuji X100V. For those looking for a stealthy, low-profile and compact APS-C camera but with more flexibility and versatility than the fixed-lens X100V, the new X-E4 could be the answer.

Like its predecessor, the X-E3, the aptly-named X-E4 successor maintains this model line's distinctive rangefinder-style design -- complete with the usual rectangular shape and built-in EVF in the top-left corner -- though with some modern refreshes. Styling-wise, the design is a bit more chiseled and angular like the X100V, though the overall volume of the camera is more or less identical to the X-E3. There have also been some new features added, including a flip-up LCD screen, plus some minor tweaks to the controls.

As with the rest of Fujifilm's recent camera models, the new X-E4 adopts the same overall imaging pipeline: a 26MP X-Trans sensor and latest-generation image processor -- a pleasing and expected upgrade over the X-E3's older 24MP sensor and X Processor Pro chip. Additionally, the X-E4 now comes at a more affordable price than what the X-E3 did upon its debut, retailing for $849.95 body-only compared to $900 for the X-E3.

While the exterior of the X-E4 shares a lot of similarities with the X100V, the X-E4 is quite similar to the recent X-S10 camera, when looking under the hood. Much like how the X-T4 vs. X-Pro3 in the pro/enthusiast segment share more or less similar sets of features and performance specs yet differ primarily in form factor, the same can now be said for this "intermediate level" of X Series cameras. For those who want a more SLR-style camera, there's the X-S10. While those who want more portability or an ultra-compact street-shooting rangefinder-style camera, there's now the updated X-E4. However, there is one major feature difference between these two intermediate-level models, and that is in-body image stabilization. The X-S10 has it, while the X-E4 does not. To keep things steady and stable, X-E4 shooters will need to rely on steady hands or optically-stabilized Fujinon lenses.

Let's dive on in for the full tour of the Fuji X-E4's specs and features...

Key Features & Specs

  • 26.1-megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS 4 BSI image sensor
  • Quad-core X-Processor 4 image processor
  • 425-point hybrid AF system with phase-detect
  • ISO range: 80-51200 (Native: 160-12800)
  • Faster 15fps burst shooting with mechanical shutter
  • New shutter mechanism rated to 300,000 actuations
  • 8fps with mechanical shutter; 20fps with electronic shutter
  • 4K 30p video; 4:2:2 10-bit external; 4:2:0 8-bit internal
  • Full HD up to 240fps
  • 18 Film Simulations
  • 180-deg. flip-up LCD touchscreen
  • 2.36M-dot/100fps OLED EVF
  • $849.95 body-only

Design & Handling

As you can see from the images, the new Fuji X-E4 bears a striking resemblance to the X100V fixed-lens camera, except, of course, the X-E4 allows for interchangeable lenses. The Fuji X-E4 combines excellent portability and a lightweight design with the versatility of an interchangeable lens camera. Much like the X100V, the X-E4's design has evolved to a more angular and sleeker look with "sharper" edges; a design that feels both modern yet classically retro -- as is characteristic of many of Fujifilm's X Series cameras, particularly those with a two-tone silver and black design.

In terms of physical specifications, the Fuji X-E4 is more or less identical to its predecessor model, save a few millimeters here and there, and very similar to the X100V, if slightly smaller in all dimensions and lighter. The new model weighs in at 364g body-only, compared to 337g for the X-E3 and 478g for the X100V. While we don't yet know the specifics of the X-E4's construction (other than utilizing a magnesium-alloy top plate), the X100V, on the other hand, is constructed nearly entirely of metal and features weather-sealing. In contrast, the X-E4 feels more in-line with the X-S10 -- no weather-sealing and composed of a combination of metal and plastic in the body construction.

Looking closer at the camera's design, the new X-E4 is much flatter and sleeker than both the predecessor and the current X100V. The X-E4 is essentially flat across the front and rear, with no grip or thumb rest built into the camera itself. There is a textured, leather-like coating covering nearly the entire front, sides and rear surface of the camera to provide some grip. The sleek, block-like shape ensures that the camera can be as compact and as portable as possible. For those who want a bit more grip, particularly when using longer or heavier lenses, Fujifilm does offer both a screw-on baseplate grip (MHG-XE4) and a thumb-rest add-on that slots into the hot shoe (TR-XE4).

The Fujifilm X-E3 (top) compared to the revised X-E4 (bottom).

In terms of buttons and controls, the X-E4 is a bit more sparse than its predecessor, doing away with the rear thumb dial, and providing only a single front-facing control dial. Fuji's also done away with a dedicated "Auto" switch on the top of the camera -- which previously let the user flip the camera into a highly automatic "Advanced SR Auto" mode. Instead, Fujifilm has added a "P" (Program Auto) setting onto the primary shutter speed dial on the top deck of the camera.

Elsewhere along the top, the X-E4 features a dedicated exposure compensation dial, much like the previous model, as well as a standalone custom function button. The "Q" menu button has now also moved up to the top deck, as it previously had a spot on the thumb rest protrusion on the X-E3.

Moving to the back of the camera, the majority of the camera is dominated by the large 3.0-inch touchscreen LCD panel. As mentioned, the new X-E4's LCD screen is now articulated, rather than a fixed display. The size is the same as before, though the resolution has been increased slightly to 1.62-million dots over the 1.04M-dot display of the older model. The EVF, on the other hand, is more or less the same as the one on the prior model, featuring a 0.39-inch OLED panel with 2.36 million dots of resolution, a 100fps refresh rate, and providing a 0.62x magnification factor.

Given the lack of a built-in thumb rest now, which housed a couple of buttons on the predecessor model, the button layout has been rearranged on this latest model, with controls placed in a similar fashion to those on the X100V for the most part. Along the right side of the LCD, the camera features the multi-directional joystick control (again, no 4-way directional buttons), the Menu/OK button and a Display/Back button. Along the top, next to the EVF, we have the Drive/Delete button, Playback and AEL/AFL button.

Ports, Connectivity & Storage

When it comes to ports and connectivity, the X-E4 features a modest amount of wired connectivity options. However, it's a more updated and user-friendly set of connections and ports. For starters, the camera now features a more-common 3.5mm microphone input rather than the smaller 2.5mm jack on the predecessor. The X-E4 also includes a USB-C port in place of a Micro-B USB 2.0 port. The USB-C port supports charging and data transfer, as well as a headphone jack thanks to the, included USB-C to 3.5mm headphone adapter. Finally, there is also a Type-D Micro HDMI port that supports 4K 4:2:2 10-bit video output.

In terms of storage, the camera features a single SD card slot that is, surprisingly, still only UHS-I compatible (though both the X100V and X-S10 also still only support the UHS-I SD speed class). The card slot is also located in the same bottom compartment as the battery.

Speaking of battery, the X-E4 uses the same NP-W126S lithium-ion battery, which is the same battery pack used by its predecessor, the X100V and several other Fujifilm X Series models. According to Fujifilm specs, the X-E4 is CIPA-rated for 380 shots per charge.

Image Quality

The most significant upgrade for the X-E4 is the move to Fujifilm's latest-generation imaging pipeline, one shared across many different X Series models. Like the X100V, X-S10, X-T4 and others, the new X-E4 now sports a higher-resolution 26.1-megapixel backside-illuminated X-Trans CMOS IV sensor paired to a faster, quad-core X Processor 4 imaging processor. The X-E4 offers a native ISO range of 160-12,800, with an expandable low ISO of 80 and extended high ISO settings up to ISO 51,200.

Like other Fujifilm X cameras, the X-S10 can capture images in both RAW (uncompressed, losslessly compressed or compressed) and JPEG, and as expected, features the full array of Film Simulations offerings, including the latest ETERNA Bleach Bypass film simulation. In total, the X-E4 offers 18 different Film Simulation presets. The Film Simulations go beyond just standard "images filters," however. (We did a thorough deep dive into how they work here). Fuji's Film Sims let you easily customize the look and feel of your images all within the camera without the need to post-process images (if you don't want to).

Autofocus & Performance

When it comes to AF and performance features, the new Fuji X-E4 is, once again, very similar to its "sibling" camera, the X-S10. With the same sensor and processor as the X-S10/X100V/X-T4 and so on, both the AF system and performance features are by and large the same here on the X-E4.

The camera features a hybrid phase-detection-based autofocus system with 2.16 million phase detection pixels that cover nearly the entire sensor area and allow for up to 425 user-selectable AF points. According to Fujifilm, the X-E4's AF system is capable of grabbing focus in about 0.02 seconds and can operate in low-light conditions down to -7EVs. The camera also features high-precision Tracking AF functionality as well as both Face and Eye-Detection AF.

In terms of burst shooting, the new X-E4 isn't as powerful as the higher-end models, despite the same processor; there are slight differences when it comes to burst shooting. The X-E4 can shoot up to 8fps with the mechanical shutter, whereas the X-T4 reaches up to 15fps. However, with the electronic shutter, the X-E4 is on-par with its big brothers, offering blackout-free shooting at 20fps at full-resolution or 30fps in a lower-res 1.25x crop mode.

When it comes to buffer capacity, the X-E4's buffer depth varies depending on the image quality setting and the continuous shooting rate. At the fastest 20fps full-res shooting mode with the electronic shutter, the buffer tops-out at around 32 JPEGs and 17 RAW (in either lossless compressed, uncompressed or compressed raw settings). With the mechanical shutter, the X-E4's 8fps maximum burst rate fills up the buffer after 105 JPEGs, 18 lossless compressed raws, 23 uncompressed raws or 18 compressed raw frames. You can get essentially unlimited JPEG buffer capacity if you lower the burst rates down to 3 or 4 fps.

Video

On the video side of things, the Fuji X-E4 is, as expected, very similar to the X-S10 in terms of video performance, offering features such as DCI 4Kp30 recording with no crop, a 200Mbps bitrate and 1080p video at up to 240p. One of the main differences of the X-E4/X-S10, however, compared to higher-end Fuji cameras like the X-T4, is a lack of 4K/60p recording capabilities.

However, despite that one missing spec, the X-E4 is quite a capable video camera, despite its compact size. In addition to DCI (4096 x 2160) 4K, it can also shoot 4K UHD (3840 x 2160) at up to 30p and can output 4:2:2 10-bit video through the HDMI. Internal recording is set at 4:2:0 8-bit. Full HD recording is also available at up to 240fps, which allows for excellent slow-motion capabilities.

Video is recorded using Long GOP compression, and bitrates are offered up to 200Mbps. The camera also supports F-Log recording and offers F-Log View Assist (BT.709) in-camera to help assist with exposure settings in this extra-flat recording mode. The X-E4 supports Face & Eye Detection autofocus functionality in video recording.

The continuous recording time is, however, limited to approximately 30 minutes per clip. However, it should be noted that the higher-end X-T4 can't record video for an unlimited amount of time, either; for example, 4K 60p video is capped at around 20 minutes, and lower 4K frame rates top-out at around 30 minutes.

Pricing & Availability

The Fujifilm X-E4 is set to go on sale in March with an estimated retail price of $849.95 body-only. The X-E4 will be sold in both an all-black color as well as a two-toned silver and black design. There will also be a kit configuration available, paired with the redesigned XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR lens, which will retail for $1049.95.

 

Buy the Fujifilm X-E4

Your purchases support this site

Buy the Fujifilm X-E4
Similar to the X-E4 but smaller lighter larger sensor cheaper But ...
loading
No cameras match your search criteria(s)
   

$0.00

24.2 MP (8% less)

Lacks viewfinder

13% larger

X-E4 vs ZV-E10

$549.33 (100% more)

24.1 MP (8% less)

Lacks viewfinder

13% smaller

X-E4 vs EOS M200

$699.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Lacks viewfinder

13% larger

X-E4 vs X-A7

$799.32 (100% more)

26.1 MP

Also has viewfinder

37% larger

X-E4 vs X-T30

$599.95 (100% more)

24.3 MP (7% less)

Also has viewfinder

24% larger

X-E4 vs X-E3

$449.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Lacks viewfinder

13% smaller

X-E4 vs EOS M100

$499.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Lacks viewfinder

10% larger

X-E4 vs X-A5

$799.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Also has viewfinder

48% larger

X-E4 vs X-T200

$959.95 (100% more)

20.9 MP (25% less)

Also has viewfinder

47% larger

X-E4 vs Z fc

$748.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Also has viewfinder

39% larger

X-E4 vs A6100

$849.33 (100% more)

32.5 MP (20% more)

Lacks viewfinder

30% larger

X-E4 vs EOS M6 Mark II

$539.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Lacks viewfinder

15% larger

X-E4 vs EOS M6

$0.00

24.2 MP (8% less)

Also has viewfinder

52% larger

X-E4 vs EOS M50 II

$898.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Also has viewfinder

40% larger

X-E4 vs A6400

$549.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Lacks viewfinder

8% larger

X-E4 vs X-A3

$599.00 (100% more)

16.1 MP (62% less)

Lacks viewfinder

7% larger

X-E4 vs E-PL10

$2320.94 (100% more)

24.24 MP (8% less)

Lacks viewfinder

Similar size

X-E4 vs TL2

$1348.50 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Also has viewfinder

32% larger

X-E4 vs A6500

$499.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Also has viewfinder

39% larger

X-E4 vs X-T100

$848.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (8% less)

Also has viewfinder

26% larger

X-E4 vs A6300

Suggestion for improvement? Head over here.