Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor

 
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Updates
07/15/2021: Field Test & Gallery Images added

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Field Test

Does Nikon's new 105mm macro lens deliver the goods?

by Jeremy Gray | Posted 07/15/2021

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.3, 1/1250s, ISO 250.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Nikon's venerable AF-S Micro Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G VR has long been a staple lens for Nikon shooters interested in macro photography. I'm confident that plenty of these lenses have been adapted to Nikon's new Z cameras with Nikon's FTZ adapter. Now, there's a native option for the Z system with the Nikkor Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S.

The modernized macro lens (Nikon calls it a 'micro' lens because it doesn't utilize enlarging optics in its design) includes Nikon's latest bells and whistles, promising outstanding image quality and overall performance. Does it deliver on these promises? Let's find out.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.2, 1/1250s, ISO 400.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Key Features and Specifications

  • 1:1 macro lens, native for Nikkor Z mount
  • S-Line lens
  • Maximum aperture is f/2.8, although at 1:1, the max aperture is f/4.5
  • 16 elements in 11 groups
  • 3 extra-low dispersion and 1 aspherical lens elements
  • Includes Nano Crystal Coating and ARNEO coating
  • Weather-sealed and includes fluorine coating
  • Has a wide focus ring and includes a control ring
  • Includes OLED information panel
  • Has L-Fn button, large focus ring and focus limiter switch
  • Weighs 630g (1.4 lbs.)
  • 140mm (5.5”) long with a maximum diameter of 85mm (3.3”)
  • 62mm filter thread
  • Includes optical VR rated for up to 4.5 stops
  • $1,000
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.3, 1/400s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Lens design and handling

The Nikkor Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S lens is quite similar in size and shape to the Nikon AF-S Micro Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED VR lens for Nikon F mount, albeit with Nikkor Z styling. The new Z mount macro lens is 140mm (5.5") long with a maximum diameter of 85mm (3.3"). The existing F mount lens is shorter at 116mm (4.6") but has about the same maximum diameter at 116mm (3.3"). So the new lens is longer, but this difference in length is reduced compared to adapting the F mount version with an FTZ adapter.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Product Image
The Nikon MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S is a stylish lens sharing its style and design with other S-Line lenses for the Nikon Z system.

Despite being longer, Nikon's latest macro lens is a bit lighter than the older F mount version, shaving off nearly 100g of weight. The Nikkor Z MC 105mm weighs 630g (1.4 lbs.), whereas the F mount lens weighs 720g (1.58 lbs.) It's not a huge difference in weight. Still, given that the new lens is slightly longer, the weight is distributed differently, and the result is a lens that feels surprisingly lightweight when you pick it up and handhold it for extended periods.

Despite feeling lightweight, the new lens doesn't feel cheap at all. It has pro-grade build quality, including weather sealing, like other Nikkor Z S-Line lenses. The new lens has a silver S-Line badge, by the way, something previous S-Line Nikkor lenses haven't included. It's a nice little flourish.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Product Image
The lens is 140mm (5.5") long without its lens hood. The lens hood adds a fair bit of length, as you can see here, which can occasionally be an issue when shooting macro as the hood can create shadows.

In terms of practical features of the lens's design, it includes an OLED information panel on top, which has been offered in some other S-Line lenses, such as the 14-24mm f/2.8, 24-70mm f/2.8 and 70-200mm f/2.8 zoom lenses and Nikon's highly-specialized Noct lens. The new MC lens's information panel is slightly different, though, in that it includes an option to display magnification ratio, which is a neat feature for macro shooting. You can also display aperture, focus distance and depth of field. I wish the OLED panel could be set to always be on. It turns off after about 10 seconds, which limits its usability. It's annoying to always have to press the DISP button essentially whenever I want to see information on the lens.

In addition to the OLED information panel and its accompanying DISP button, the lens also includes an L.Fn button and two switches, an AF/MF toggle and a focus limiter that limits autofocus to a macro range. The switches are in a convenient location and are built well.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Product Image
The OLED information panel displays key shooting information, including aperture, focus distance, depth of field and for the first time, magnification ratio.

Also located in a good spot is the generously wide focus ring. Despite being a focus-by-wire lens, the manual focus experience is quite nice, and the ring has a nice feel. There are no soft stops or hard stops with the focus ring. The lens also includes a control ring closer back towards the lens mount, which can be set to adjust different camera settings.

The lens comes with a lens hood, which is fairly well built. It's not an exciting accessory, but it's important that it works well and is easy to put on and take off. The locking lens hood ticks these boxes. However, I didn't use the hood as much as I would with other lenses, as it can sometimes cast shadows during macro work. That's merely a usability observation, however, and not an issue with the lens hood itself. Speaking of included accessories, I miss the days when Nikon's high-end lenses came with padded zipper cases. That excellent accessory has gone the way of the dodo with the Z system, it seems, and it's a shame.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Product Image

Overall, the Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S is a well-designed lens with great build quality. It's not super compact, but it feels very light in hand and is easy to use. The lens is stylish, sleek and works well. I wish the OLED panel could be set to always-on, an OLED should use little power, anyways, but other than that, the lens has an excellent design.

Image quality: Excellent performance from Nikon's new S-Line MC lens

The Nikkor Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S lens has 16 elements in 11 groups. Among these elements are three extra-low dispersion elements and an aspherical lens element. The S-Line lens also includes Nikon's sophisticated Nano Crystal Coating and ARNEO anti-reflective coating.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/13, 1/500s, ISO 400.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/13, 1/500s, ISO 400.
100 percent crop of the above image. This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

All the crops seen below are 100 percent crops from raw image files converted in Adobe Camera Raw using default settings and built-in lens correction profiles enabled. I have selected specific images to show, but you can download the full-size raw files for each test scene and aperture in the Gallery.

Close focus scene

The following images are all shot at the lens's minimum focus distance, meaning they are 1:1 macro shots. While a macro lens is often used for macro photography, shooting at 1:1 can be somewhat unusual. The depth of field is razor-thin, and the working distance can be limiting.

I could not get the $1 bill to lay perfectly flat, which does matter when working at 1:1 distances in terms of sharpness across the entire frame. Instead of focusing on edge-to-edge performance, which, as we'll see later, is good with this lens, I'm more concerned with optimal sharpness at the focus point, which is around the left edge of the middle of the '1' on the bill.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4.5, 1/30s, ISO 100.
Full test scene at 1:1. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

At f/4.5, which is the lens's maximum aperture at its closest focusing distance, the lens is pretty sharp. As you can see, even the tiniest difference in height in the bill is revealed in this situation. It's hard to imagine many practical scenarios for f/4.5 at 1:1 distances, honestly. Nonetheless, the maximum detail is good, and the lens exhibits good contrast and strong control of aberrations.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4.5, 1/30s, ISO 100.
100 percent crop at 1:1. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

At f/5.6 through f/11, performance is excellent. The lens is very sharp.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/5.6, 1/20s, ISO 100.
100 percent crop at 1:1. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/8, 1/10s, ISO 100.
100 percent crop at 1:1. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/11, 1/5s, ISO 100.
100 percent crop at 1:1. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

At f/16, diffraction becomes slightly noticeable, although the lens is still sharp. I find that the softening is problematic at f/22 and beyond.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/16, 0.4s, ISO 100.
100 percent crop at 1:1. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/22, 0.8s, ISO 100.
100 percent crop at 1:1. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The lens continues to stop down all the way to f/51 at this focus distance. You can check out these shots in the Gallery, although they're pretty soft.

Standard test scene

In my standard lens sharpness test scene, the Nikkor Z MC 105mm performed very well. The lens may be a macro lens, but that doesn't mean it can't perform well in a much wider range of situations. Further, in non-macro settings, the lens can shoot at its maximum aperture of f/2.8, which is nice.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/2.8, 1/2000s, ISO 100.
Full test scene. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

At f/2.8, the Z MC 105mm f/2.8 is sharp in the center of the frame. The lens resolves good fine detail with strong contrast and color. Performance drops off a bit at the extreme edges of the frame, as expected, but remains strong. There's some evident vignette (corner darkening), but overall detail is good.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/2.8, 1/2000s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/2.8, 1/2000s, ISO 100.
100 percent bottom right corner crop. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Stopping down improves overall image quality, and I think it's noticeable even when you aren't pixel peeping. That isn't to say the lens is soft at f/2.8 – it isn't – but it is very sharp at f/4 and f/5.6. There's also less vignette and overall better corner performance at f/4 and f/5.6 compared to f/2.8.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4, 1/1000s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4, 1/1000s, ISO 100.
100 percent bottom right corner crop. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/5.6, 1/500s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/5.6, 1/500s, ISO 100.
100 percent bottom right corner crop. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The Nikkor Z 105mm f/2.8 VR S continues to perform well at f/8 and f/11, delivering very good sharpness and overall image quality. At f/16, at least at this sort of focus distance, image quality drops off quite significantly, and the image becomes soft.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/8, 1/320s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/11, 1/160s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Image quality summary

Nikon's new pro-grade macro lens for its Z system delivers excellent optical performance. The lens is sharp wide open across its focus distance range and displays excellent control over optical aberrations, including chromatic aberration and fringing. That's no small feat for any lens, but it's an especially challenging engineering issue for macro lenses.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.3, 1/500s, ISO 500.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

By stopping down slightly, the lens gets even better. There's a slight vignette when shooting wide open, which is significantly reduced by stopping down, and overall sharpness is fantastic after stopping down 1-2 stops. It can be challenging to shoot at macro distances, especially when photographing a moving subject, but it's very satisfying when everything clicks.

Autofocus performance

The Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S has a dual-motor multi-focus STM system with manual focus override. The lens promises swift, responsive and accurate autofocus performance. I'd say that it mostly delivers on this promise, although autofocus speed is not lightning quick at macro focus distances. The lens also includes a new AF algorithm to improve autofocus performance in changing light conditions, and in my experience, Nikon's new lens delivers excellent performance in this situation.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4, 1/1000s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

When trying to photograph small, fast-moving subjects like insects, the lens struggled to keep up. However, that's an arduous task for a lens. At non-macro distances, autofocus is considerably faster. The STM system also helps control aberrations and color fringing, by the way, and as we saw, the lens does great with optical performance.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.3, 1/1600s, ISO 200.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Something that helps a bit with autofocus performance at macro distances is the focus limiter. On many lenses, like telephoto zooms, an AF limiter prevents the lens from focusing too closely, which can slow it down. For example, if you're photographing wildlife that's more than 10m away, many lenses will let you limit the AF system to not try to focus any closer than that. This prevents the lens from getting stuck at its close focusing distance, hunting for a subject. Instead, Nikon's new MC lens has a switch to limit you from 0.29m (1:1) to 0.5m (just over 1:3). It's a smart feature. As an aside, the lens does make a noticeable buzzing sound when focusing, especially at close focusing distances. It can be a bit jarring at first, but it's not too loud.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4.5, 1/500s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

In the Field: A versatile lens with great macro capabilities and strong mid-telephoto performance

In the field, the Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S is a great lens. Its optical performance is great, as we've seen, and autofocus is generally good, too. The lens also has VR, which works in tandem when paired with an IBIS-equipped Z camera, such as the Z7 II I used. The VR stabilization is rated for up to 4.5 stops, and I think Nikon's rating makes sense here. At very close focusing distances, any camera shake is exacerbated, so VR is a nice inclusion.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/6.3, 1/800s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/6.3, 1/800s, ISO 100.
100 percent crop of the above image. This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Manually focusing with any macro lens is a somewhat regular occurrence, certainly more so than with many other types of lenses. The manual focus ring is very good, especially for a focus-by-wire lens. You can make very fine-grained focus adjustments with the lens, but you can also rather quickly focus if you rotate the focus ring swiftly. That said, the lens has variable focusing speed, meaning that the lens will move slowly through its focus at close focus distances. For example, rotating the same speed at macro distances will cover a much shorter distance than if you were near infinity. This makes manually focusing on close subjects easier. Small physical rotations result in tiny focus adjustments.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.3, 1/2500s, ISO 800.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

As mentioned earlier, the maximum aperture of the Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S depends on the focus distance. At its closest focus distance, the lens has a maximum aperture of f/4.5. To shoot with an f/2.8 aperture, your subject must be just over 1.5m away, which is a 1:15 reproduction ratio. F/3 is available until 1:5 reproduction ratio (just under 0.7m). The lens is an f/3.2 lens from there until just under 0.5m and f/3.3 until slightly under 0.4m. From 0.36 to 0.4m, the lens is an f/3.5 optic. From 0.33 to 0.36m, it's an f/3.8. The maximum aperture is f/4 until focusing at 0.31m. It's an f/4.2 lens for basically just around 0.3m, and then it's an f/4.5 lens at 0.29m. The camera does a fine job of changing the aperture on the fly, and the electromagnetic diaphragm keeps exposure consistent, even when recording video.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4, 1/1000s, ISO 3200.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The MC 105mm f/2.8 delivers nice bokeh in a wide range of situations. The bokeh is quite nice when used as a mid-telephoto lens, such as with the loon shot below. The edges around specular highlights can be abrupt, but the bokeh maintains a nice shape and is pretty clean. There's some 'cat's eye' as you move toward the edge of the FX image area, but it's not too bad and is rarely distracting. You could use the lens for portraits and feel good about the bokeh performance, even if it won't match something like a 105mm f/1.4 or f/1.8.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/2.8, 1/640s, ISO 125.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

When shooting a close-up subject, the bokeh is very impressive. The lens does a great job of blurring the background, and bokeh is buttery smooth. When you get very close to your subject, the background can stay very soft even after stopping down a bit to achieve better sharpness or more depth of field.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.2, 1/1000s, ISO 400.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

By the way, the Nikon Z cameras have built-in focus stacking features, but I want to cover that in a separate article featuring both of Nikon's new Z MC lenses. Stay tuned to Imaging Resource for our upcoming Field Test for Nikon's other new macro lens, the Nikkor Z MC 50mm f/2.8 Macro.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4, 1/500s, ISO 400.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.3, 1/1000s, ISO 720.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.2, 1/400s, ISO 100.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/7.1, 1/500s, ISO 100.
Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/7.1, 1/500s, ISO 100.
100 percent crop of the above image. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/3.2, 1/320s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/7.1, 1/125s, ISO 200.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Field Test Summary

Another excellent addition to Nikon's Z system and a great lens for macro photography

What I like most about the lens:

  • Good build quality
  • Impressive image quality
  • Very sharp
  • A great macro lens capable of doing much more
  • Reasonably priced
Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/8, 1/125s, ISO 560.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

What I dislike about the lens:

  • Autofocus is sluggish at close-focusing distances
  • OLED panel turns off too quickly
  • Maximum aperture isn't f/2.8 if you're shooting macro
  • Doesn't accept Nikon's teleconverters

The Nikkor Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S is an outstanding lens, both as a macro lens and as a mid-telephoto optic. The lens features good build quality, outstanding image quality and is enjoyable to use. If you're into macro photography and want an excellent native lens for your Z camera, this is the one to get.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot on Nikon Z7 II, f/4.5, 1/800s, ISO 2800.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

 

• • •

 

Nikon NIKKOR Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Overview

(From Nikon lens literature) The NIKKOR Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S is a high-quality S-line lens1 engineered for a wide array of shooting styles and designed to deliver intense sharpness and beautiful bokeh. The lens' 1:1 reproduction ratio resolves details missed by the human eye and can reproduce subjects at life size. With a versatile mid-telephoto focal length and fast f/2.8 maximum aperture, the NIKKOR Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S provides the benefits of two lenses in one, with the ability to capture elaborate details as well as striking portraits.

Constructed with an optical formula designed for macro photography, the NIKKOR Z MC 105mm features a larger rear aspherical lens element to reduce field curvature from infinity to close-up. Additionally, the lens' short minimum focusing distance of 0.96 feet (0.29m) allows for sharp images with a heavily blurred background, drawing in the viewers' attention and adding scale when photographing small details.

The NIKKOR Z MC 105mm's Multi-Focus STM system affords consistently smooth, silent and accurate focus due to the customized autofocus algorithm, which accounts for minute distance changes that alter the effective aperture. The lens also includes a limiter switch to reduce the working range to a maximum of 1.6 feet (0.5m), in order to acquire focus efficiently and quickly. Furthermore, with a near-silent AF performance, the lens allows users to capture high-quality still images and videos without disturbing small creatures in the field.

Equipped with 4.52 stops of Vibration Reduction, the NIKKOR Z MC 105mm makes it easy to shoot handheld and allows users to confidently capture tack-sharp images or videos of products, food or animals. The lens is also compatible with the in-body stabilization feature in the full-frame Z series mirrorless cameras, providing 5-axis VR.

As part of the premium S-line, the NIKKOR Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S includes NANO Crystal and ARNEO Coatings to limit flare and ghosting effects, even with backlighting. This new lens combines useful controls, including a manual focus ring, lens function shortcut button, control ring and lens info panel with robust weather sealing for truly reliable performance in adverse conditions.

Professional commercial photographer and Nikon Ambassador Joey Terrill was tasked with evaluating the new lens and capturing content prior to its public release. He was thoroughly impressed with its performance, stating, "The NIKKOR Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S is unquestionably the most exceptional lens I've ever used. The clarity, color fidelity, and breathtaking sharpness are present in every image. Pictures feel textural and dimensional while maintaining stunning subject accuracy. It is the perfect match for the extraordinary resolution and expansive dynamic range of the Z camera sensors, and the nuance from tone to tone feels as pure as photography can be. It's very likely this lens will be permanently affixed to my camera going forward"

Price and Availability

The NIKKOR Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S will be available in late June 2021 for a suggested retail price (SRP) of $999.95.

*SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.
Specifications, equipment and release dates are subject to change without any notice or obligation on the part of the manufacturer.

Nikon Z MC 105mm f/2.8 VR S Nikkor

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