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Digital Cameras - Casio QV-7000SX Test Images

Outdoor portrait: (419k) The main image (419k) here was shot with two steps of exposure compensation, while this one (435k) was shot with only one. (These steps are supposedly 1/4 stop increments, but the effect they have seems to be greater than that.) Even the brighter of the two images holds detail well in the strong highlights of the model's shirt. Resolution and detail appear typical of a 1280x960 camera, and color rendition is generally good, particularly the natural skin tones. One oddity: The model's bright blue pants and the blue fabric in the artificial flowers are rendered with a distinct purplish cast. This is odd, in that this hue error seems to occur either only for a very narrow range of shades of blue: It can be seen in just a portion of the Oriental model's robe in the "musicians" image, but is nowhere to be found in the entire range of colors found in the "Davebox" target. We call attention to it here because it is so evident, but note that the effect seems very limited in its impact.
 

Closer portrait: (427k) Excellent color, tone and detail in this shot! Not a whole lot else to say about it, this is a very good performance on a difficult subject with strong highlights and subtle pastel flesh tones. One minor defect: There's a slight vertical "striping" evident in darker areas, particularly in the deep shadows around the model's eyes. We're a bit puzzled by this artifact though, as we couldn't find it in any of our other shots. As such, it may be related to the extremely strong illumination this photo was taken under, and the resulting short exposure time...  

Indoor portrait, flash: (423k) This is a tricky shot for digital cameras to get right, as the relatively strong room lighting has a very warm tint, while the light from electronic flash units is generally daylight-balanced. The result usually is either a strong color cast, or odd color shifts between the areas illuminated primarily by the flash, and those lit mainly by the ambient light. The QV-7000SX performed exceptionally well here though, with the flash providing just the right amount of fill light to lighten the shadows, while showing only a slight warmish tint from the room lighting, and no odd coloration due to flash/incandescent interaction.  

Indoor portrait, no flash: (395k) This picture is a pretty severe test of a camera's white balance capability, shot as it is under standard household incandescent lighting. (Which has a very pronounced yellowish cast.) We were surprised here both by how exceptionally well the QV-7000's automatic white balance worked, and by how poorly the manual "incandescent" setting did. The main picture (395k) here was shot with automatic white balance, and the exposure compensation set up by 2 steps, while this one (379k) used the same settings, but with the exposure compensation boosted upward one more notch. This shot (395k) was taken with the white balance set to the "incandescent" option, which strangely resulted in a very heavy yellowish cast, looking more like the white balance was actually set to "daylight." (We'll repeat this one in our next shooting session, in case we actually had the white balance set to "daylight" by mistake.)  

House shot: (446k) Our main shot here (446k) was taken with the white balance set to "auto". Color is quite good, but detail is a bit soft, relative to the camera's 1280 x 960 resolution. On this shot, we ran a full series of shots at each resolution setting, so you could evaluate the camera's performance in each resolution mode. These shots are arranged in the table below. We also shot one image in "economy" mode, with the white balance set to "daylight", rather than auto. (Strangely, the "Fine" mode image turned out larger than the "Super" one.) This image (139K) shows a bit cooler color cast, although both daylight and auto settings produced images well within the range of variation we've seen among competing devices.

AutoWhite
Super
(446k)

AutoWhite
Fine
(488k)

AutoWhite
Normal
(275k)

AutoWhite
Economy
(140k)

 
 

Far-Field shot: (570k) This image is shot at infinity to test far-field lens performance. NOTE that this image cannot be directly compared to the other "house" shot, which is a poster, shot in the studio. The rendering of detail in the poster will be very different than in this shot, and color values (and even the presence or absence of leaves on the trees!) will vary in this subject as the seasons progress. In general though, you can evaluate detail in the bricks, shingles, and window detail, and in the tree branches against the sky. Compression artifacts are most likely to show in the trim along the edge of the roof, in the bricks, or in the relatively "flat" areas in the windows.

The late-fall lighting in this shot produced a rather dark image overall, as the lower sun angle created a stronger highlight on the white areas than the higher, summer sun did in other cameras you may compare this one to. Again, color is quite rich and saturated, but the image is slightly "soft." We did observe that the QV-7000SX apparently avoids some of the minor sensor artifacts we saw in the earlier QV-5000's output, notably the small "zipper teeth" along strongly-contrasting vertical and horizontal edges.

 

"Musicians" poster: (518k) Good color and tonal range here, with a slightly warm cast undoubtedly caused by our choice of "auto" white balance: Based on our other experience, the explicit "daylight" setting would probably have produced a more neutral balance overall. Contrast is a little high, with the highlights in the Caucasian girl's face a little washed out. Overall, a very workmanlike performance though. Here again, we've shot images at each resolution/quality setting, with the results arranged in the table below.

AutoWhite
Super
(518k)

AutoWhite
Fine
(394k)

AutoWhite
Normal
(230k)

AutoWhite
Economy
(121k)
 
Macro shot: (583k) The QV-7000SX performed very well in the macro test, capturing a minimum area of only 1.7 x 2.25 inches (4.3 x 5.8 cm) at closest approach. Although not rated for such close work (and we don't have a shot to demonstrate it), the QV-7000's flash works quite well down to the minimum focusing distance as well. For very close work, albeit at a lower resolution, you can combine the unit's digital zoom with the macro mode to take pictures like this (189k). The active area here is only 0.85 x 1.125 inches (22 x29 mm)!  

"Davebox" test target: (387k) Excellent color and tonal range, although some noise is apparent in the shadow areas. The camera generally appears to do a good job of preserving highlight detail, at some expense to detail in the shadows. (We'll note without explanation, that this is the direction you'd prefer digital cameras to err in...) We were especially interested to see how the camera handled the wide range of colors in this subject, particularly in light of the somewhat purplish rendering of the model's pants and the blue flowers in the outdoor shot. We were surprised to see that all colors in the MacBeth and Q60 targets rendered just fine (great, in fact). Whatever the problem revealed by the purplish blues in the portrait shots does not appear to be a general one for the camera.

AutoWhite
Super
(387k)

AutoWhite
Fine
(305k)

AutoWhite
Normal
(173k)

AutoWhite
Economy
(102k)

 

ISO 12233 ("WG-18") resolution target: (412k) (Technoids only) The QV-7000SX' visual resolution is about 600 line pairs/picture height in the highest resolution mode, with roughly equivalent performance at the wide and telephoto ends of its focal-length range. Virtually no color artifacts are visible, at any target frequency. We shot a full range of resolution/quality settings, at both telephoto and wide-angle settings, with the results tabulated below. We also shot with the digital zoom in the 2X (xxxK) and 4X (xxxK) settings. As noted in the main review, the 2X digital zoom could be quite useful for web publishers, but the 4x zoom is so soft we're hard-pressed to see a use for it.

Telephoto

Super
(392k)

Fine
(302k)

Normal
(183k)

Economy
(108k)

Wide-Angle

Super
(412k)

Fine
(320k)

Normal
(186k)

Economy
(109k)

 
Viewfinder accuracy/flash uniformity target: Given that so much of our shooting requires fairly precise framing, we're always overjoyed when we find a camera with an accurate viewfinder. The QV-7000's LCD viewfinder is about as accurate as they come, showing exactly 100% of the final image area. Flash uniformity is quite good also, showing only slight falloff at the edges in wide-angle mode, and almost perfect uniformity at the telephoto end of the range.  

 

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