Fujifilm GFX 100S Review

Camera Reviews / Fujifilm Cameras i Hands-On Preview
Basic Specifications
Full model name: Fujifilm GFX 100S
Resolution: 102.00 Megapixels
Sensor size: Medium format
(43.8mm x 32.9mm)
Kit Lens: n/a
Viewfinder: EVF / LCD
Native ISO: 100 - 12,800
Extended ISO: 50 - 102,400
Shutter: 1/16000 - 3600 sec
Dimensions: 5.9 x 4.1 x 3.4 in.
(150 x 104 x 87 mm)
Weight: 31.7 oz (900 g)
includes batteries
MSRP: $6,000
Availability: 03/2021
Manufacturer: Fujifilm
Full specs: Fujifilm GFX 100S specifications

Your purchases support this site

Buy the Fujifilm GFX 100S
102.00
Megapixels
FUJINON G Mount Medium format
size sensor
image of Fujifilm GFX 100S
Front side of Fujifilm GFX 100S digital camera Front side of Fujifilm GFX 100S digital camera Front side of Fujifilm GFX 100S digital camera Front side of Fujifilm GFX 100S digital camera Front side of Fujifilm GFX 100S digital camera

Fujifilm GFX 100S Hands-on Preview

by Jeremy Gray
Preview Posted: 01/27/2021

In 2019, Fujifilm announced the GFX 100 medium-format mirrorless camera. The 102-megapixel GFX 100 offered consumers many 'world's firsts.' It was the first mirrorless camera with a 100-plus megapixel image sensor, the first medium-format camera with in-body image stabilization, and the first 4K-equipped medium-format mirrorless camera. However, breaking new ground can be expensive, and the GFX 100 launched with an accordingly high price point of $10,000.

From its front, the Fujifilm GFX 100S looks much more like a GFX 50S/R than the tall, gripped GFX 100.

The new GFX 100S keeps all these groundbreaking features and incorporates them into a lighter, smaller and more affordable package. The Fujifilm GFX 100S captures the spirit of the GFX 50S but with decidedly modern and more advanced execution.

The imaging pipeline, including the large 102-megapixel backside-illuminated CMOS sensor and X-Processor 4, is maintained. The GFX 100S promises either the same or, in some cases, even better performance than the GFX 100 and fits it all into an impressively compact form factor. Compromises have been made, but after having gone hands-on with a pre-production GFX 100S, it's a very compelling camera. It is the successor to the GFX 50S many users have been hoping for.

Fujifilm GFX 100S Key Features

  • 102-megapixel backside-illuminated CMOS image sensor
  • Native ISO range of 100-12,800
  • 16-bit raw files
  • New Nostalgic Negative Film Simulation
  • 3.76 million PDAF autofocus system covering nearly 100 percent of the image area
  • The same autofocus performance and speed as the GFX 100
  • New, smaller and more capable five-axis in-body image stabilization system
  • New smaller focal plane shutter mechanism
  • Quad-core X-Processor 4
  • 5 fps continuous shooting, 64GB DRAM
  • Weather-sealed magnesium alloy camera body
  • Dual UHS-II SD card slots
  • Top and rear sub displays
  • New controls, including top Mode dial
  • Tilting touchscreen display
  • 3.69M dot EVF (0.77x, 85fps refresh rate)
  • 4K/30p video recording
  • 12-bit ProRes RAW 4K/30p video, 4:2:0/4:2:2 10-bit (SD/HDMI)
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
Turning to the back, the GFX 100S is more like the GFX 50S/R than the GFX 100, due in part to the AF joystick and overall button layout. The GFX 100S has a different EVF than previous GFX cameras, employing the same EVF as the X-T4, which is a downgrade compared to the excellent EVF in the GFX 100.

GFX100S design and handling: A significant departure from the GFX 50S, but not a universal improvement

Where the GFX 100 was a radical departure from the design of the GFX 50S and even more so from the rangefinder inspired GFX 50R, the GFX 100S is a return to the general form and design language of the original GFX 50S in many ways. With that said, the GFX 100S has a fair bit in common with the GFX 100, too, despite looking quite different.

Comparing first to the GFX 50S, the GFX 100S has the same SLR style. The GFX 100S is thinner, losing the bulge behind the rear display. The result is a big improvement in terms of feel and appearance. The GFX 100S is more refined as a result.

The GFX 50S (left) vs the GFX 100S (right). The GFX 100S is a bit shorter, has about the same width and has the same overall grip shape and general design as the GFX 50S.

In terms of overall weight, the GFX 100S weighs about 20g less than the GFX 50S. The GFX 100S is slightly wider, slightly shorter (assuming the GFX 50S has its EVF attached), and is thinner due to the lack of bulge behind the display, which is where the GFX 50S has its battery compartment. The GFX 100S uses the same NP-W235 battery as the X-T4, which can fit inside the GFX 100S' front grip, eliminating the need to place the battery behind the rear display.

Speaking of the rear display, the GFX 100S has the same tilting 3.2" display as the GFX 100. The LCD has approximately 2.36M dots and can tilt in three directions. You can easily tilt the display up and down. You can hold a button on the left edge of the display to tilt the left edge up, making it useful when shooting in portrait orientation on a tripod. The total motion range is 90 degrees up, 45 degrees down, and 60 degrees to the right.

The GFX 100S has a tilting rear display. The display can tilt up, down and to the right.

The slimmed-down stature comes with compromises of varying importance. As a longtime GFX 50S user, a big loss is that the GFX 100S cannot accept a vertical battery grip. The GFX 50S has a fantastic optional battery grip, which might be the best and most comfortable grip I've ever used, and it is disappointing that the GFX 100S doesn't include the option to add one.

Further, the GFX 50S has a removable electronic viewfinder, which not only allows the camera to be slimmed down either for use in the field or for packing away in a bag but also allows for the use of an optional EVF tilt adapter. The GFX 100S' more traditional EVF is fixed in place, eliminating these options.

The GFX 50S (left) has more accessory options than the GFX 100S (right). The GFX 50S can accept a vertical battery grip, which is excellent, and can utilize Fujifilm's EVF tilt adapter, which is also a great accessory. These are both significant losses, in my opinion.

In terms of control changes, like the GFX 100, the GFX 100S doesn't include directional buttons on the back of the camera. On the GFX 50S, the directional pad can be used for menu navigation, and each direction is programmable to a function, which is useful. The GFX 100S instead has a joystick, which is used for moving the autofocus point while shooting and for menu navigation. You can also use the touchscreen to navigate the menus.

The GFX 100S also loses the dedicated ISO dial found on the GFX 50S but gains a larger top display that can show a digital ISO dial. The top display on the GFX 100S is fantastic, by the way, as it can show a lot of information, including a live histogram, and it's easy to read in a variety of lighting conditions. The display is 1.8" diagonally and has a 303x230 resolution.

Compared to the GFX 100, the GFX 100S has a similar button layout, but as noted, doesn't include the integrated vertical grip of the GFX 100. Like the GFX 100, and unlike the GFX 50S, the Playback button on the GFX 100S is located near the bottom right of the rear display. It's a much better spot than the awkward location on the GFX 50S. The GFX 100S also has a solid black color, like the GFX 50S/50R. The GFX 100 incorporates a two-tone black and gray design, which looks nice but doesn't fit with the Fujinon GF lenses' consistent styling.

The GFX 100S has a different eyecup than the GFX 50S and GFX 100. The EVF itself is different than both of those cameras as well, offering less magnification than the GFX 50S' EVF and less resolution and magnification than the excellent EVF in the GFX 100.

Like the EVF found on the GFX 50S, the GFX 100 also had a detachable EVF with a round eyepiece. The GFX 100S not only loses the detachability aspect, but the GFX 100S' EVF also has a rectangular eyepiece. The GFX 100S also has a lower-resolution EVF. The GFX 100 has a 5.76M dot OLED EVF, whereas the GFX 100S has a 3.69M dot EVF. The GFX 100S's EVF has 0.77x magnification and an 85 frames per second refresh rate. The GFX 100 and GFX 50S have better magnification of 0.86x and 0.85x, respectively. The GFX 100S' EVF is fine in use, but it's noticeably a step down from the fantastic EVF in the GFX 100. It's another instance of something lost in the pursuit of a lower price point.

To the left of the EVF on the GFX 100, the camera has a rotating dial to select between Movie, Multi, and Still image drive modes. There is also a Drive mode button. It's a strange use of the space. The GFX 100S, instead, includes a small switch between Movie and Still modes and opts for a full mode dial to the left of the EVF. This is a much better use of space and an improvement, in my opinion.

The GFX 50S (left) has more accessory options than the GFX 100S (right).

As part of its slimming down, the GFX 100S incorporates a new, smaller shutter mechanism and in-body image stabilization (IBIS) unit. The newly developed smaller IBIS system works better than the one found in the GFX 100. Whereas the GFX 100's IBIS topped out at 5.5 stops of compensation when using the GF 63mm f/2.8 lens, the GFX 100S's system tops out at 6 stops. Further, the GFX 100's system delivered up to 5 stops of compensation for every other GF lens, whereas the GFX 100S' ranges from 5 to 6 for other lenses, but it primarily offers between 5.5 and 6 stops of compensation. The new IBIS system weighs a bit less, too, shedding about 15 grams of weight. Finally, the IBIS in the GFX 100S can now sync with the optical image stabilization (OIS) found in the GF 120mm f/4, 250mm f/4, 45-100mm f/4, and 100-200mm f/5.6 lenses, something the IBIS in the GFX 100 cannot do.

In total, the GFX 100S is about 500g lighter and 30% smaller than the GFX 100. The IBIS system is 20% smaller and 10% lighter, a significant reduction that is critical to the GFX 100S' overall volume and design. The new smaller focal plane shutter mechanism is about 22% smaller and 16% lighter than the shutter found in the GFX 100. The new shutter has the same shutter speed range and durability rating of 150,000 actuations. Beyond size, an additional difference is that the new shutter in the GFX 100S has a slightly reduced release time lag (0.07s versus 0.09s).

The GFX 100S has a good design and feels great in the hands. The lack of a directional pad is unfortunate, but there's not necessarily a great place to put one either. The lack of ability to attach a vertical grip, although a result of balancing features with the desired price point (a great price point, by the way), is disappointing, as is inability to detach the EVF.

Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 64mm, f/11, 2.5s, ISO 100. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.

Autofocus and performance: GFX 100 features galore

The GFX 100 represents a massive upgrade in autofocus capabilities and performance compared to the GFX 50S/R. Accordingly, given that it uses the same autofocus system, so is the GFX 100S. The GFX 100S has 3.76M phase-detection autofocus pixels, which cover nearly the entire image sensor. Compared to the GFX 50S/R, the GFX 100S delivers better autofocus speed and accuracy, especially when tracking subjects and shooting in low-light or low-contrast situations. The GFX 100S can focus in light as low as -5.5 EV. The GFX 100S is up to 200% quicker than the GFX 50R. Face/eye detection AF is also improved compared to the GFX 50-series models.

In real-world use, the GFX 100S autofocus seems every bit as good as the GFX 100. AF is quick and decisive, even in challenging situations. It's not as fast as the latest and greatest full-frame cameras, but it's impressive, nonetheless. It's also a lot faster than the GFX 50S I typically use. Where the GFX 50S often hunts, the GFX 100S does not struggle.

Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 43mm, f/11, 4s, ISO 100. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.
100% crop of the above JPEG image. Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 43mm, f/11, 4s, ISO 100. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.

The AF doesn't lend itself to the GFX 100S being an action-oriented camera, and nor does the continuous shooting speed. With that said, the GFX 100S is quick, very quick when considering that it's a 102-megapixel medium-format camera. The GFX 100S features the same quad-core X-Processor 4 CPU as the GFX 100, resulting in the same maximum shooting speed of 5 frames per second.

However, there are caveats. When shooting continuously, RAW files are 14-bit, not 16-bit. Also, the buffer fills quickly and can take a decent chunk of time to clear. Considering the GFX 100S has the same guts as the GFX 100, you can refer to our GFX 100 lab tests to see what type of performance to expect from a production model GFX 100S.

When the GFX 100 introduced in-body image stabilization, it was a big deal. It still is, frankly, as it's an impressive accomplishment and truly changes how you can use the camera. The GFX 100S takes this even further with its smaller, redesigned, and more effective five-axis in-body image stabilization system. The new IBIS has an upgraded gyro sensor and detection algorithm. It can also work in sync with OIS, something the GFX 100 is incapable of doing. During my brief hands-on time, the IBIS worked as expected and is impressive.

Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 32mm, f/11, 3s, ISO 100. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.

The new shutter is not easy to appreciate when using the camera, but it's worth discussing. The focal-plane shutter is smaller and weighs less. Fujifilm was able to engineer a smaller shutter by changing the layout of the motor and gearbox. The new shutter has an improved structure for reducing shutter shock, contributing to a shorter release time lag. The shutter is smaller, sure, but no less durable. Fujifilm promises the shutter is good for 150,000 actuations, like the larger, heavier shutter in the GFX 100.

Image quality and shooting features: Same excellent image sensor promises fantastic image quality

Image sensor and image quality

Before diving into this section, I must first point out that you will be unable to download full-size images captured with the GFX 100S. I used a pre-production sample, and therefore we cannot share the image files. Further, as current software doesn't fully support RAW processing, I cannot share processed files. The images seen in this hands-on preview are resized JPEG files straight from the camera. If you want to see what this image sensor is capable of, and it's capable of a lot, I refer you to my Fujifilm GFX 100 Field Test for now. There you can download full-size images and RAW files from the Gallery and our lab testing. You should expect the GFX 100S to deliver similar imaging performance.

As mentioned, the GFX 100S uses the same 102-megapixel backside-illuminated CMOS image sensor as the GFX 100. The sensor is 43.8 x 32.9 mm, making it about 1.7x larger than a full-frame image sensor. While a medium format sensor, the GFX series doesn't use the same size image sensor as a Phase One or a Hasselblad H System medium format systems, which utilize 54 x 40 mm image sensors.

Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 64mm, f/4, 1/100s, ISO 6400. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.

The GFX 100S image sensor omits an optical low-pass filter to ensure excellent sharpness. Based on my time with the camera, it captures extremely sharp images, especially at low ISO settings. The native ISO ranges from 100 to 12,800, and across much of this range, the image quality impresses.

Although I cannot process RAW files yet, the GFX 100S records 16-bit images, something the GFX 50S/R cameras cannot do. Based on my experience with the GFX 100, I expect the GFX 100S's 16-bit RAW files to be very flexible during processing and deliver fantastic sharpness, colors, and tonal ranges. The dynamic range, especially at low ISO settings, should be excellent.

Fujifilm recently released a firmware update for the GFX 100 that added the ability to use a new Multi-Shot Pixel Shift mode. This new mode, which requires specific Fujifilm software to use, produces a 400MP final image. I will be fully testing this mode during an upcoming Fujifilm GFX 100S Field Test as soon as I can get a final production review unit.

Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 32mm, f/13, 4s, ISO 100. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.

Shooting features

Something not available in the Fujifilm GFX 100 is the new Nostalgic Negative Film Simulation. It's possible, although I think unlikely, that it could be added to the GFX 100 via a firmware update. Fujifilm is excellent with adding new features to its existing cameras via firmware, but I don't recall any instance of a Film Simulation being added later. For example, the GFX 50S/R never received the Eterna Film Simulation included in the GFX 100. The new Nostalgic Negative Film Simulation is a color Film Simulation inspired by the 'American New Color Photography' movement that began in the 1970s. Senior director of marketing and product development for Fujifilm North America's Electronic Imaging Division, Victor Ha, says of Nostalgic Negative, 'This Film Simulation mode adds an amber tone to highlights for a uniquely soft look and boosts saturation to shadows, while still preserving details, to deliver images that feel both familiar and unfamiliar all at the same time.'

Video: 4K/30p camera with the addition of digital image stabilization

The Fujifilm GFX 100S includes the same video features as the GFX 100, plus a bit more. The GFX 100S records both DCI 4K (17:9) and 4K UHD video at up to 29.97p with a maximum bit rate of 400Mbps. The camera records using the image area's full width for 4K modes and for 1080/60p video (17:9 and 16:9 aspect ratios are available).

The top of the GFX 100S is better-designed than the top of the GFX 100 thanks in large part to the revised mode dial design.

The GFX 100S has a new trick up its sleeve, however: digital image stabilization. When recording using Digital IS, there is a 1.1x crop, but that's the only difference. It will be interesting to see how the Digital IS performs during rigorous testing.

In terms of overall video features, the GFX 100S records in AAC/H.264/H.265(HEVC) codecs and has access to 19 Film Simulations. The camera records F-Log/HLG/ProRes RAW video formats, including 12-bit recording over HDMI. Using HDMI, the video is 4:2:2. When recording to the internal SD card, the video is 4:2:0. Video may have been something of an afterthought with the GFX 50S/R cameras, with the best video recording option being 1080/30p, but the video capabilities of the GFX 100S are impressive.

Ports, power and connectivity: GFX 100S uses a different battery

The GFX 100S writes images/videos to dual UHS-II SD card slots. Like the GFX 100, there's no XQD/CFexpress card slot. The camera includes the following ports: USB-C, Micro HDMI, PC Sync, 2.5mm remote release, 3.5mm microphone, and 3.5mm headphone. The GFX 100S doesn't include the AC adapter port of the GFX 100, which could be a big deal for studio photographers but is unlikely to matter much to most photographers. You can power the camera via the USB-C port using external power supplies.

The GFX 100S has many of the same ports as the GFX 100, but doesn't have an AC port. However, you can power the GFX 100S via USB-C.

In terms of power, the GFX 100S uses the same NP-W235 lithium-ion battery as was introduced alongside the Fujifilm X-T4. The battery is rated to deliver 460 frames per charge. This is 60 more shots than a single NP-T125 battery in the GFX 100, although that camera does accept two batteries. When recording video, you can expect about two hours of continuous recording. There is no video recording limit for the GFX 100S; instead, you are limited by storage or power.

Fujifilm GFX 100S versus Fujifilm GFX 100 and GFX 50S/R

GFX 100S versus GFX 100

The GFX 100S shares a lot in common but has significant differences from its 102-megapixel sibling, the GFX 100. The most obvious difference is visual, as the GFX 100S is much more compact than the GFX 100. The differences in form factor and desired price point results in the GFX 100S having a lower-res, non-detachable, and less impressive electronic viewfinder overall. It also means that where the GFX 100 has a built-in grip, the GFX 100S cannot accept an optional grip.

Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 64mm, f/16, 12s, ISO 100. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.

On the plus side, the GFX 100S has a new smaller shutter mechanism and, more impressively, a smaller and lighter in-body image stabilization system that is better. The GFX 100S also has a different battery, which delivers more still frames per charge.

The list of what's the same between the $10,000 GFX 100 and the $6,000 GFX 100S is much longer than the list of what's different. Both cameras use the same imaging pipeline, including the fantastic 102-megapixel backside-illuminated CMOS image sensor. The much-improved phase-detect autofocus system is also the same as is the good continuous shooting performance. And the 4K/30p video with no crop? The same.

GFX 100S versus GFX 50S/R

Like the GFX 100, the GFX 100S outstrips the GFX 50S/R in practically every way. The primary difference is, of course, the image sensor. 102 megapixels is a heck of a lot more than 50.1, and the GFX 100S includes a 400-megapixel Multi-Shot Pixel Shift feature. The image sensor itself is just better, too, offering 16-bit recording, improved dynamic range, and better tonal response.

The GFX 50S (left) has a different control layout than the GFX 100S (right). I prefer the buttons of the GFX 100S overall, although I do miss the directional pad found on the GFX 50S.

The GFX 100S also features the vastly improved phase-detect autofocus system, which is better across the board than the contrast-detect system in the GFX 50S/R. The GFX 100S also has improved continuous shooting performance despite having a higher resolution sensor. Plus, the GFX 100S has in-body image stabilization, which is a big deal and results in the GFX 100S being a more capable camera in a wider variety of situations. When considering the large difference in autofocus performance, the GFX 100S is a significantly more versatile camera.

Video is also a massive area of disparity between the GFX 100S and the GFX 50S/R. The GFX 50S/R records 1080/30p video, whereas the GFX 100S records 4K/30p video. The GFX 100S has many more video-centric features and functions as well, making it a legitimate video camera, while the GFX 50S/R is one of the last cameras I'd reach for to record video.

On the negative side, the GFX 50S has a detachable EVF and can accept an optional vertical battery grip, things the GFX 100S cannot do. But the GFX 100S has, in my opinion, a better overall design and control layout.

Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 64mm, f/11, 4.5s, ISO 100. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.
100% crop of the above JPEG image. Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR lens at 64mm, f/11, 4.5s, ISO 100. Original JPEG image file. Shot with a pre-production Fujifilm GFX 100S using pre-production firmware.

The case for the GFX 100S

You get a lot of camera for the money. The GFX 100, despite its high price, was a relatively good value in the medium format camera market. The GFX 100S then is an even stronger value. Admittedly, you lose some functionality and features in exchange for the $4,000 reduction in price, but for almost everyone, especially those looking to upgrade from a GFX 50S or GFX 50R, opting for the new 100S over the GFX 100 is an easy choice.

But is the GFX 100S worth upgrading to for existing GFX 50S/R owners? It's not obvious. I need more time with the GFX 100S to decide how much better it is than the GFX 50S I have used since the GFX system launched. I believe that the GFX 100S promises to be an excellent camera and a great value in the medium-format space.

With its 102-megapixel medium-format CMOS image sensor, the GFX 100S promises excellent image quality. Stay tuned to Imaging Resource for our full Field Test of the GFX 100S.

Pricing and availability: A potential steal at $6,000 and arriving soon

The Fujifilm GFX 100S will launch with an MSRP of $6,000 USD ($7,800 CAD). The camera is expected to arrive in March. It will be available in black and as a body-only option. An optional metal hand grip will also be available for $149 USD ($195 CAD).

 

Buy the Fujifilm GFX 100S

Your purchases support this site

Buy the Fujifilm GFX 100S
Similar to the GFX 100S but smaller lighter larger sensor cheaper But ...
loading
No cameras match your search criteria(s)
   

$4499.00 (100% more)

51.4 MP (98% less)

Also has viewfinder

32% smaller

GFX 100S vs GFX 50R

$5750.00 (100% more)

51.3 MP (99% less)

Also has viewfinder

36% smaller

GFX 100S vs X1D II

$5499.00 (100% more)

51.4 MP (98% less)

Also has viewfinder

7% smaller

GFX 100S vs GFX 50S

$2998.00 (100% more)

61 MP (67% less)

Also has viewfinder

42% smaller

GFX 100S vs A7R IV

$3899.00 (100% more)

45 MP (127% less)

Also has viewfinder

15% smaller

GFX 100S vs R5

$6498.66 (100% more)

50.1 MP (104% less)

Also has viewfinder

35% smaller

GFX 100S vs A1

$9999.00 (100% more)

102 MP

Also has viewfinder

48% larger

GFX 100S vs GFX 100

$2996.95 (100% more)

45.7 MP (123% less)

Also has viewfinder

46% smaller

GFX 100S vs Z7 II

$2496.95 (100% more)

45.7 MP (123% less)

Also has viewfinder

50% smaller

GFX 100S vs Z7

$5995.00 (100% more)

47.3 MP (116% less)

Also has viewfinder

108% smaller

GFX 100S vs SL2

$2298.00 (100% more)

42.4 MP (141% less)

Also has viewfinder

52% smaller

GFX 100S vs A7R III

$0.00

24.6 MP (315% less)

Also has viewfinder

Similar size

GFX 100S vs SL2-S

$1799.00 (100% more)

30.3 MP (237% less)

Also has viewfinder

21% smaller

GFX 100S vs EOS R

$1996.95 (100% more)

24.5 MP (316% less)

Also has viewfinder

46% smaller

GFX 100S vs Z6 II

$4498.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (321% less)

Also has viewfinder

42% smaller

GFX 100S vs A9 II

$1598.00 (100% more)

42.4 MP (141% less)

Also has viewfinder

86% smaller

GFX 100S vs A7R II

$1396.95 (100% more)

24.3 MP (320% less)

Also has viewfinder

46% smaller

GFX 100S vs Z5

$1698.00 (100% more)

24.2 MP (321% less)

Also has viewfinder

52% smaller

GFX 100S vs A7 III

$1596.95 (100% more)

24.5 MP (316% less)

Also has viewfinder

50% smaller

GFX 100S vs Z6

$2499.00 (100% more)

20.1 MP (407% less)

Also has viewfinder

15% smaller

GFX 100S vs R6

Suggestion for improvement? Head over here.


Editor's Picks