24.20
Megapixels
Canon EF/EF-S APS-C
size sensor
image of Canon EOS Rebel T7i (EOS 800D)
Front side of Canon T7i digital camera Front side of Canon T7i digital camera Front side of Canon T7i digital camera Front side of Canon T7i digital camera Front side of Canon T7i digital camera
Basic Specifications
Full model name: Canon EOS Rebel T7i (EOS 800D)
Resolution: 24.20 Megapixels
Sensor size: APS-C
(22.3mm x 14.9mm)
Kit Lens: 3.06x zoom
18-55mm
(29-88mm eq.)
Viewfinder: Optical / LCD
Native ISO: 100 - 25,600
Extended ISO: 100 - 51,200
Shutter: 1/4000 - 30 seconds
Max Aperture: 4.0 (kit lens)
Dimensions: 5.2 x 3.9 x 3.0 in.
(131 x 100 x 76 mm)
Weight: 26.3 oz (747 g)
includes batteries, kit lens
Availability: 04/2017
Manufacturer: Canon
Full specs: Canon T7i specifications

Canon T7i Review -- Now Shooting!

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Preview posted: 02/14/2017
Last Updated:

Updates:
03/20/2017: First Shots posted
04/04/2017: Performance posted

For those looking for our detailed product overview, complete with specs and features, click here for our Canon T7i Overview.

 

Canon T7i First Shots

Canon’s first DIGIC 7 Rebel-series DSLR makes its way to our testing lab

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The latest Rebel-series camera, the Canon T7i (aka the EOS 800D for Europe or the Kiss X9i for Japan) is the first EOS DSLR model, along with simultaneously-announced EOS 77D, to feature the latest DIGIC 7 image processor. We now have our review unit in our hands and are ready to share our signature Cano T7i First Shots series of lab test images for your discerning eyes.

Although the T7i gets an upgrade in the processing horsepower department, it's nevertheless paired to a similar 24.2-megapixel APS-C image sensor as housed in the earlier T6i and T6s models from 2015. However, thanks to the updated processing, the ISO range has been expanded, going from a native ISO 100-25,600, with an expanded high ISO sensitivity of 51,200. By contrast, the Canon T6i/T6s top out at ISO 12,800 as their highest native ISO, and ISO 25,600 as the maximum expanded ISO.

The question now is, with our First Shots series offering straight-from-camera JPEGs and RAW images across the full ISO range, how has the image quality performance changed or improved from the earlier DIGIC 6-based DSLRs, and how does it stack up against major competitors. We have a couple of quick comparisons ready for you down below, but to compare the Canon T7i First Shots against any other camera we've tested, please visit our handy Comparometer.

Canon T7i vs. Canon T6s

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image
Base ISO (100): Canon T7i (left) vs. Canon T6s (right)

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image
ISO 3200: Canon T7i (left) vs. Canon T6s (right)

Canon T7i vs. Nikon D5600

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image
Base ISO (100): Canon T7i (left) vs. Nikon D5600 (right)

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image
ISO 3200: Canon T7i (left) vs. Nikon D5600 (right)

Stay tuned for more from our Canon T7i review!

Canon T7i First Shots

 

Canon T7i Review -- Overview

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Canon T7i Review -- Product Image

Almost two years ago, Canon launched its new Rebel T6i and T6s DSLRs, a duo which shared many features with each other. They also blurred the line between the top end of Canon's entry-level EOS Rebel lineup, and the bottom end of the enthusiast and pro-oriented EOS lineup. Now, the company has launched the 24-megapixel Canon Rebel T7i, and that division between entry-level and enthusiast DSLRs blurs even further.

The new Rebel flagship is essentially an EOS 77D-lite.

The Rebel T7i slots into Canon's lineup directly above the earlier T6s (which remains on sale) and T6i (which, now that the T7i is here to follow in its footsteps, is no longer current). The next rung up the ladder from the T7i, meanwhile, is the simultaneously-launched EOS 77D. Take a look at the specs of the Canon T7i and compare them to that camera, and you'll find it's much quicker to list the features which differ between the two, rather than those that they share. These two cameras are very closely related indeed, even if only one bears Rebel branding.

And since it shares so liberally with the higher-priced EOS 77D, the Canon T7i marks a number of firsts for the Rebel line. It's the company's first Rebel model to feature a 45-point all cross-type autofocus system, as well as its first with Dual Pixel CMOS autofocus. It's also the first Rebel model to feature Canon's DIGIC 7 image processor.

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image

Some important differences between the Canon T7i and its EOS sibling

Of course, the Canon T7i has a Rebel-class pricetag as well, where the EOS 77D is a little bit pricier. That being the case, Canon has not surprisingly reserved some features for the more expensive model. If you opt for the Rebel T7i, for example, you'll find that it lacks the top-deck LCD status display found on the EOS 77D, with its Mode dial instead assuming this location on the top deck.

The Canon T7i also lacks the AF-On button of its EOS sibling, as well as that camera's Quick Control dial and locking switch. And in the absence of a top-deck status display, it uses what would be the LCD illumination button as a display control for the rear-panel LCD instead. The rear-panel button layout is also a little different from that of the EOS 77D, since the Rebel T7i has a bit more room to spare as it lacks its sibling's Quick Control dial and switch.

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image

The Canon T7i also has one less custom function than does the EOS 77D, and has a total of ten less available settings for custom functions, and so won't prove quite so customizable as its higher-end sibling. It's also just a touch lighter, though, which may prove handy if you want to keep your load to a minimum, especially when traveling. (The difference in weight isn't huge, but if you've got a lot of gear to bring along on a trip, every little bit helps.)

In other respects, the Canon T7i offers most of its sibling's features at a significantly lower price

Beyond those main points -- and doubtless some more minor differences elsewhere -- the Canon T7i gives you most of what's offered by the EOS 77D for a good bit less cash. Both cameras share the same 24.2-megapixel, APS-C sized image sensor, for example, and use the same DIGIC 7 image processor.

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image

This provides an identical sensitivity range of ISO 100 to 25,600-equivalents for the pair, and also yields the same burst capture performance for both. Like the EOS 77D, the Canon Rebel T7i can shoot at six frames per second in single-servo AF, while enabling continuous-servo AF provides for a choice of either 3.5 or 4.5 fps burst capture.

Both cameras also rely on the same pentamirror viewfinder design as each other, and feature the same 45-point, all cross-type autofocus system complete with viewfinder indications. The pair also both feature Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS AF system, allowing a manufacturer-claimed minimum time to focus lock of just 0.03 seconds.

On their rear panels, both the Canon Rebel T7i and EOS 77D share the same 3.0-inch, vari-angle, touch-screen LCD monitor. And both models also share the same selection of in-camera Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Near-Field Communications radios for quick and simple image sharing.

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image

They also share a friendly new guide system which offers both text and visual confirmation of what the effect on your photos of different camera modes and features will be. One slight difference here, though, is that the guide system is enabled by default on the Canon T7i, but disabled by default on the 77D. Incidentally, you can separately enable or disable the system in two parts: One for the Mode guide, and another for the Feature guide.

As well as stills, the Canon T7i can also shoot movies at up to Full HD (1,920 x 1,080-pixel) resolution with a maximum frame rate of 60 fps. In addition, the T7i can record HDR and time-lapse movies at Full HD resolution with a fixed 30 fps frame rate.

Canon T7i Review -- Product Image

Canon T7i pricing and availability

Available from April 2017, the Canon T7i is expected to ship at a retail price of around US$750 body-only, approximately US$150 less than the EOS 77D.

Two kit versions will also be available: One with the new, smaller Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens for US$900, and the other with the EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens for US$1,300. Interestingly, while the T7i 18-55mm kit is also some US$150 less than its EOS 77D equivalent, the 18-135mm kit is a full $200 less expensive than the 77D 18-135mm kit, making it an especially good deal for potential T7i buyers.

 

Canon T7i Review -- Technical Info

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Posted:

Sensor

The Canon Rebel T7i is based around a 24.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS image sensor, the same resolution as used in the previous-generation camera. The image sensor is overlaid with a low-pass filter that subtly blurs the finest details to help fight moiré and false-color effects, a sensible choice in a camera aimed at consumers. Total resolution of the 22.3 x 14.9mm sensor is 25.8 megapixels, and it has a 3:2 aspect ratio. The pixel pitch is approximately 3.72µm, and an RGB Bayer color filter is used.

Processor

Output from the Canon T7i's image sensor is handled by the company's current-generation DIGIC 7 image processor.

Sensitivity

Together, this pairing of sensor and processor are able to provide a wide sensitivity range encompassing everything from a minimum of ISO 100-equivalent to a maximum of ISO 25,600-equivalent by default, with the ability to expand this range to a maximum of ISO 51,200-equivalent if image quality isn't your primary concern.

An auto sensitivity function is provided, and able to span the entire standard sensitivity range when shooting without flash in Program, Priority or Manual exposure modes. In most other modes, auto sensitivity is capped at a maximum of ISO 6400-equivalent.

Performance

At its fastest, the Canon T7i can capture some six frames per second with single-servo autofocus, meaning that focus is not being adjusted after the first frame has been captured. Enabling continuous autofocus reduces this rate to a maximum of 4.5 fps, while a low-speed continuous mode can shoot at 3.0 fps.

The buffer depth for JPEG images is essentially limited only by available card space and power, presuming you're shooting with a UHS-I compliant flash card. If you're a raw shooter, Canon predicts a UHS-I burst depth of 27 raw frames, while raw+JPEG shooters should be able to manage around 23 frames in a burst.

Optics

As in the company's other recent APS-C DSLR offerings, the Canon T7i features a Canon EF / EF-S compatible lens mount that can use either full-frame or sub-frame optics. Note, though, that (again as in other Canon DSLR models) the Rebel T7i cannot use EF-M lenses designed for Canon's mirrorless cameras.

Autofocus

For the second generation running, the Canon T7i has received a big upgrade in the autofocus department. (And that's true whether we're talking about shooting through the viewfinder, or in live view mode.)

Let's start with viewfinder-based shooting. Here, the Canon T7i relies on a dedicated phase detection autofocus sensor to provide a total of 45 autofocus points across much of the image frame, with all of them being cross-types that are sensitive to detail on both the horizontal and vertical axes. Of these, 27 points work to f/8 (although only nine of them on both axes), and the central point is a dual cross-type supporting either f/2.8 or f/5.6.

The dedicated PDAF sensor has a working range of -0.5 to 18 EV, while the centermost point can manage -1 to 18 EV at f/5.6, or -3 to 18 EV at f/2.8. Focus points can be selected automatically, manually, or grouped as either three or nine AF zones. Autofocus assist illumination is provided with intermittent firing of the T7i's built-in, popup flash strobe.

Returning to the live view mode, meanwhile, the Canon T7i uses Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology to focus using phase-detection autofocus pixels on the image sensor, a system which works with all EF and EF-S lenses to date. Contrast-detection autofocus isn't provided, but you can of course focus manually, with an optional 5x or 10x focus magnification function to help you get your chosen subject tack-sharp.

Metering

Like the T6i before it, the Canon T7i uses a 7,560 pixel RGB+IR metering sensor that's sensitive to red, green, blue and infrared light. This helps both with exposure metering of difficult subjects, and with determining the location of skin tones (and thereby, the locations of people, allowing the exposure to be tweaked for the most attractive results.)

Viewfinder

Like most consumer DSLRs, the Canon T7i features a pentamirror optical viewfinder, as opposed to a brighter, heavier and more expensive pentaprism. Coverage is approximately 95%, which is again typical for consumer DSLRs, and magnification is about 0.82x, unchanged from the T6i.

Eyepoint is approximately 19mm (at -1m-1 from the eyepiece lens center) and there's a dioptric adjustment with a range of -3.0 to +1.0m-1. An LCD overlay in the viewfinder allows a generous range of information to be provided to you without the need to switch to the main LCD monitor, including AF points and AF area frames, spot metering circle, electronic level, grid, aspect ratio lines and flicker detection.

Unlike the viewfinder in the simultaneously-launched EOS 77D, that used in the Rebel T7i lacks a proximity sensor adjacent to the viewfinder eyepiece. That difference means you'll need to manually toggle the display mode using a dedicated button on the top deck to disable the LCD, if you want to prevent glare and improve battery life when shooting through the finder.

Display

On the rear of the Canon T7i is a side-mounted, tilt/swivel LCD monitor similar to that of the earlier Rebel T6i. As in that camera, it's based around a 3.0-inch LCD panel with a total dot count of around 1.04 million dots, and is overlaid with a touchscreen that allows it to be used as an input device. Coverage is a manufacturer-claimed 95%, and the monitor features Canon's Clear View II coatings, which aim to prevent smudges but not reflections. A seven-step brightness control is provided to help improve indoor / outdoor visibility.

And thanks to the articulation mechanism, which allows viewing from a wide range of angles, it's both selfie-friendly (assuming you're using an appropriate lens, of course), and can be closed inwards for a modicum of protection against smudges or minor bumps and scrapes.

The Canon T7i lacks the secondary, monochrome LCD panel of the EOS 77D, which sits on the top deck and provides a quick at-a-glance indication of basic camera settings.

Flash

To help throw a little more light on nearby subjects, the Canon T7i includes a built-in, popup flash that sits in the traditional position above the viewfinder pentamirror housing. The built-in flash has a guide number of 12 meters at ISO 100, and it can also be used as a master in an optical wireless flash setup.

Of course, there's also a flash hot shoe on the top deck for use with external strobes. E-TTL II flash metering is used, and +/-2 EV of flash exposure compensation is available in 1/3 or 1/2 EV steps.

Creative

The Canon Rebel T7i offers all of the usual creative options, just as you'd expect from a DSLR camera.

You can, of course, opt for Program (with Program Shift), Aperture-priority, Shutter-priority or fully Manual exposure modes. There's also a choice of Scene Intelligent Auto or Creative Auto modes, a Flash Off mode, plus a choice of four Scene modes with their own positions on the Mode dial: Portrait, Landscape, Close-up and Sports. In addition, there's a Scene position which provides access to a further seven scene modes, plus a Creative Filters position which offers up a total of ten filter types.

Canon's Picture Style function, meanwhile, provides for seven preset picture styles, plus both an auto style selection function and three user-defined styles. A total of eight white balance modes are provided, including auto (with ambience or white-priority controls), custom and six presets. Color temperature can also be tweaked within +/- nine steps on the blue/amber and magenta/green axes.

Movie

The Rebel T7i provides the ability to record high-definition movies at up to Full HD (1,920 x 1,080 pixels) resolution with a rate of up to 60 frames per second, double the 30p maximum of the T6i. 30p and 24p rates are also available at Full HD, but not the 25p rate which was available in the earlier camera. At HD resolution (1,280 x 720 pixels), a choice of 30p or 60p rates is offered, while VGA (640 x 480) mode is now fixed at 30 fps.

Recording time per clip is limited to 29 minutes and 59 seconds. The maximum movie file size is 4GB unless you're using an exFAT file system, but the T7i will automatically create subsequent files without interruption up to the aforementioned time limit.

Like the Canon T6s before it, the Canon T7i can also shoot high dynamic range movies, a feature that will likely pay dividends in difficult lighting situations. It can also shoot time-lapse movies, a new addition since the Rebel T6s and T6i.

Audio comes courtesy of a built-in stereo microphone, or via a 3.5mm microphone jack which can be found beneath an access panel on the left side of the camera's body. Movies are recorded using MPEG-4 AVC / H.264 compression with a variable bit-rate, an MP4 container and AAC stereo audio.

Wireless connectivity

The Canon T6s brought in-camera Wi-Fi and NFC to the flagship Rebel camera, and now the Canon T7i adds Bluetooth into the mix. And not only can this all be used to get your photos onto your smartphone or tablet -- and from there, to social networks -- just as quickly as possible, but the Bluetooth radio in particular can be used with a new BR-E1 Bluetooth wireless remote control. This has a range of 16 feet, and does not require line-of-sight access to the camera body, potentially making it more useful in certain situations.

Wired connectivity

Wired connectivity in the Canon T7i includes a USB 2.0 High Speed data port and a Type-C HDMI high-definition video output. Unlike the earlier T6i, there's no longer any support for standard-definition displays.

A second flap covers a wired remote jack and a 3.5mm stereo microphone jack, but there's no headphone jack. Of course the Rebel T7i includes a dedicated hot shoe for external flash units and other shoe-mount accessories.

Storage

Images and movies are stored on Secure Digital cards, courtesy of a single SD card slot that is compatible with SDHC, SDXC and UHS-I cards. The Canon T7i also supports Eye-Fi cards, although given the in-camera Wi-Fi connectivity, there would seem to be little reason to use one.

Still images can be stored in raw or JPEG formats, or both simultaneously. Movies are stored in MP4 format, using an MPEG-4 AV/H.264 codec for video compression, and AAC stereo for audio.

Power

Power comes courtesy of a proprietary LP-E17 lithium-ion battery pack, the same model used earlier in the T6i. Battery life is now rated at 600 shots on a charge when using the optical viewfinder or 230 shots in live view mode, both figures having been recorded at 73°F and with 50% flash usage. That's a healthy step upwards from the 440 and 180 shots on a charge, respectively, for the T6i and T6s in viewfinder and live view shooting.

 

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