Basic Specifications
Full model name: Fujifilm X100T
Resolution: 16.30 Megapixels
Sensor size: APS-C
(23.6mm x 15.6mm)
Lens: Non-Zoom
(35mm eq.)
Viewfinder: Hybrid / LCD
Native ISO: 200 - 6400
Extended ISO: 100 - 51,200
Shutter: 1/32000 - 30 seconds
Max Aperture: 2.0
Dimensions: 5.0 x 2.9 x 2.1 in.
(127 x 74 x 52 mm)
Weight: 15.5 oz (440 g)
includes batteries
Availability: 11/2014
Manufacturer: Fujifilm
Full specs: Fujifilm X100T specifications
16.30
Megapixels
Non-Zoom APS-C
size sensor
image of Fujifilm X100T
Front side of Fujifilm X100T digital camera Front side of Fujifilm X100T digital camera Front side of Fujifilm X100T digital camera Front side of Fujifilm X100T digital camera Front side of Fujifilm X100T digital camera

X100T Summary

Overall, the Fuji X100T is a lot like the earlier X100S. It's not vastly improved over the earlier model, particularly in terms of the imaging pipeline, but it does offer a handful of physical and cosmetic improvements, especially in terms of better controls and a larger LCD. With the same sensor, lens and image processor, the much-lauded image quality of the X100S remains in this updated model. Performance and speed factors remain virtually unchanged, with both good points and bad. All told, it's not a massive upgrade to the X100S, but if you're looking for a cool, compact rangefinder-esque street shooter, the Fujifilm X100T is a great choice.

Pros

Attractive, retro rangefinder-style design; Excellent still image quality; Great, sharp f/2 35mm-equivalent lens; Overall better operation than the X100S with improved controls and dials; Improved optical viewfinder coverage; Built-in Wi-Fi.

Cons

Low-light AF still slow and inconsistent; Video quality still compromised by moire and lack of image stabilization; Buffer depths could be better when shooting RAW.

Price and availability

Available since mid-November 2014 in black or silver-bodied variants, the Fuji X100T is priced at US$1,300, same list price as the previous model.

Imaging Resource rating

4.5 out of 5.0

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Fuji X100T Review

by and Eamon Hickey
Review posted: 07/21/2015
Last updated:

---

Update:
The successor to the X100T has been revealed as the Fuji X100F. It not only boosts resolution to 24 megapixels, but vastly improves autofocus and adds other new features and performance upgrades as well, all for the same list price. See our Fuji X100F coverage for details!

---

Fuji X100T review -- three quarter view from left

In early 2013, Fujifilm introduced the X100S, a bright-lensed camera nicely aimed at the street photography niche, and a followup to the earlier Fuji X100. Although we appreciated its image quality and a reduction in lens flare exhibited by the earlier camera, we had some reservations due to some quirks, predominantly related to its autofocus, controls and body design.

Now, the followup Fuji X100T aims to take the best of its predecessors, answer our main criticisms of their design, and bring them up to date with some worthwhile tweaks to the viewfinder, display and connectivity.

What hasn't changed since the X100S is the imaging pipeline, which we commended in the earlier camera. The Fuji X100T shares the same 16.3-megapixel X-Trans CMOS II image sensor, the same EXR Processor II image processor, and the same bright 35mm-equivalent f/2.0 prime lens that together makes this a great little candid street shooter.

And given that the pipeline is unchanged, unsurprisingly neither is the X100T's burst performance of about six frames per second. You can also still extend reach of its prime lens in either direction with optional 0.8x wide and 1.4x tele converters.

So what has changed? First and foremost, it's the Fujifilm X100T's body design. A number of controls have been reworked to answer concerns we raised in our X100S review. The X100T now offers support for third-step aperture control on the ring surrounding the lens barrel, and has a true rear dial instead of a control that looks like a dial, but is actually a clickable rocker.

Fuji X100T review -- front view

Fuji has also removed the awkwardly-positioned, easily-bumped dial that encircled the four-way controller, and standardized on 45-degree diamond knurling for the three exposure controls (aperture, shutter speed and exposure compensation). These changes together make for a scant 5g reduction in weight, and around a 1mm reduction in thickness, neither of which is enough to be noticeable in the real world. There's also a new accessory grip that should make the camera easier to carry without fear of an accidental drop.

Fuji X100T review -- top view

But that's far from all. Fujifilm has also gifted the X100T with in-camera Wi-Fi connectivity -- including remote control and live view capability -- and honed the viewfinder with higher accuracy plus a clever new electronic rangefinder function. There's also a larger, significantly higher-resolution LCD monitor, a super-speedy electronic shutter function, more internal memory, and a more up-to-date Micro HDMI connector in place of the Mini HDMI connector which relatively few cameras use these days.

Fuji X100T review -- rear view

And there are plenty of changes in firmware, too. The maximum ISO sensitivity has been raised to ISO 51,200 equivalent, and three Auto ISO modes let you define various sensitivity limits for quick recall. Fujifilm has also added a new interval timer function that lets you track changes in your subject over longer periods with a minimum of fuss. And as in the Fuji X30, there's also a new Classic Chrome film simulation.

Fuji X100T review -- optional grip and cases

The Fuji X100T has kept much of what we loved about its predecessors, while bringing the design right up to date in the connectivity and display departments, and answering some of our main ergonomic concerns.

One thing that hasn't changed is the pricetag. Available since mid-November 2014 in black or silver-bodied variants, the Fuji X100T is priced at US$1,300, meaning you get a fair bit more camera for the exact same list price as before.

Place your order with a trusted Imaging Resource affiliate now:

Fujifilm X100T Field Test Part I

Old school, updated

by Eamon Hickey |

Fujifilm  X100T shooter's report photo Within an hour or two of unpacking my first digital camera way back in 1996 (a Nikon Coolpix 100 demo unit), I was already dreaming about a compact fixed-lens digital camera for enthusiast photographers with real, direct exposure and focus controls. Sadly, a combination of bad luck and laziness had prevented me from shooting with any Fujifilm X-series models before now, so I jumped at the opportunity to try out the new X100T and see if my almost two-decade longing could be satisfied.

Design & Handling. As I unboxed the Fujifilm X100T, I had a few immediate impressions. It is indeed a great-looking camera. It’s just a tad bigger than I was hoping, but it’s also lighter than I expected, a good thing in a camera that I intended to use as a carry-everywhere quality snapshooter. The camera body itself, as well as the control dials and buttons, generally have a high quality feel, but I was disappointed in the somewhat flimsy, light feel of the rear command dial, which is too easy to turn.

Fujifilm X100T Field Test Part II

View from a lens. One lens.

by Eamon Hickey |

Fujifilm  X100T shooter's report photoPerformance. I found the Fujifilm X100T to be a fairly good performer overall, with a couple of modest exceptions. Once I had it on and activated, it responded essentially instantly to any control inputs, but it was sometimes just a bit slow to wake from sleep. It’s a small issue, and in my outings with the X100T I didn’t miss any shots because of it, but I think if I owned one, this might rear up and bite me every now and then.

As I mentioned in part 1 of this report, my first time out with the Fujifilm X100T was to shoot the Thanksgiving Day parade, and my next two shoots after that were also outdoors during daylight. I shot most of my images on these walks using the camera’s Single AF (AF-S) autofocus setting, and it worked very well for me, focusing quickly and decisively. On one walk, I suddenly noticed a construction crew just as they were fastening cables to a crane hook, and I was able to focus and shoot in a second or less; the camera’s AF system was easily quick enough for this kind of street shooting. On later outings, I tried the X100T’s AF system on nighttime subjects in the East Village neighborhood, and here again the camera focused well on the high-contrast subjects I was shooting using the AF-S mode. With some later indoor shots in restaurants, the X100T’s AF-S system was somewhat slower but still worked reasonably well, focusing accurately in about a second or a little less.

Fujifilm X100T Technical Insights

by Mike Tomkins |

Fujifilm  X100T tech section illustrationSame sensor and processor... At the heart of the Fujifilm X100T are the exact same 16.3-megapixel X-Trans CMOS II image sensor and EXR Processor II image processor as in 2013's Fuji X100S.

...but greater sensitivity. The Fuji X100T retains its predecessor's sensitivity range of ISO 200 to 6400 equivalents, but this can now be expanded a little further at the upper range. The expanded range now runs from ISO 100 to 51,200 equivalents, where the X100S topped out at ISO 25,600 equivalent. And you now get a choice of three Auto ISO positions, allowing you to define variant limits for each, and then quickly recall the Auto ISO mode whose limits match your current needs at any given moment. Handy!

Performance is similar, but burst depth varies. Although the sensor and processor combo not surprisingly derive the same performance of about six frames per second (with an available 3fps rate if you don't need full-speed shooting), JPEG burst depth is said to have fallen somewhat.

Fujifilm X100T Conclusion

X100S Refined: Better controls, bigger LCD but same great image quality

by William Brawley |

While the X100S was a vastly superior camera to the original X100, the new Fujifilm X100T brings a host of refinements and subtle improvements rather than drastic changes to Fuji's cool, compact rangefinder-style camera, making the new model all the more functional. For starters, Fujifilm, it seems, took the philosophy of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" regarding the imaging pipeline of the X100T. Keeping the same 16.3-megapixel X-Trans CMOS II image sensor and EXR Processor II image processor, as well as the same 35mm-equivalent f/2 prime lens, the X100T's resulting image quality is practically identical to its predecessor-- and that's not a bad thing. The image quality from the Fuji X100T is very good, with excellent dynamic range, accurate color and fantastic high ISO performance for its class.

 

In the Box

The Fuji X100T retail box includes (may vary by region):

  • Fujifilm X100T digital camera
  • NP-95 Lithium-ion battery pack
  • BC-65N Battery charger
  • Shoulder strap
  • Lens cap
  • Metal strap clip
  • Protective cover
  • Clip attaching tool
  • USB cable
  • Owner's Manual (Basic Operations)

 

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Fuji X100T vs Fuji X100S

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