• 1 inch 116.2mm2
  • 20.2 megapixels
  • 3.6x zoom 28mm - 100mm (35mm equiv.)
  • $610 Average Retail $750 MSRP
  • 1 inch 116.2mm2
  • 20.2 megapixels
  • 3.6x zoom 28mm - 100mm (35mm equiv.)
  • $484 Average Retail $650 MSRP

Buy From

Comparison Review

The difference in name between 'RX100' and 'RX100 II' is minor, but when it comes to features and performance the RX100 II is clearly the superior model. Still, with the original RX100 sometimes dropping in price to less than $500 (at the time of thiswriting), it's a good alternative for someone who wants a solid compact camera, but balks at the RX100 II's $700 price tag.

RX100 II connectivity: it's there, but it's not brilliant

The RX100 II offers Wi-Fi support, which lets you upload photos and control the camera from your smartphone. Unfortunately, we found the Wi-Fi interface a little clunky; only one size photo is automatically transferred to your phone, you can't share photos with social networks directly from the camera and the controls available to you from your smartphone are rather limited: shutter, exposure compensation and video recording. So the Mark II does give you Wi-Fi, but it's not a particularly strong implementation.

Accessorize!

The accessory hot shoe is a nice addition, letting you attach an external flash, the fantastic (optional) electronic viewfinder accessory, or an external mic. The tilting LCD is another welcome addition, letting you compose your shots up high or down low. Sony also saw fit to improve video frame rate options, and you get a slightly faster AF with the RX100 II as well.

The main attraction for the Mark II is the greatly improved sensor

But the real draw? That would be the RX100 II's sensor. Sony swapped out the original RX100's sensor for a version using backside illumination (BSI), a technology that greatly improves light sensitivity on sensors of this size and resolution. This gives you roughly an extra stop of performance when it comes to high ISO noise: ISO 3200 on the RX100 II should be as clean as ISO 1600 on the RX100 (you can see for yourself how good it is in the low light comparison section of our review). And of course noise at any given ISO drops significantly. Not content to just raise sensitivity at a given ISO, Sony also increased the maximum ISO from 6400 to 12,800.

Given the price difference, it's something of a toss-up

The RX100 II won our award for the best pocket camera of 2013, and is the superior camera by just about any measure. But is it worth the $150-200 price difference? Our testing didn't see as big an improvement in RAW files as JPEG files (~1/3-1/2 stop vs ~1 stop), so RAW shooters on a tight budget might give careful consideration to the RX100. And those on a budget or those who don't need the latest features might also consider saving their money. That's because the RX100 is a stellar camera -- so good, in fact, that it took the award for best pocket camera of 2012. Despite being nearly 3 years old now, it's arguably the best compact camera available for $500 (again, at time of this writing).

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Advantages

Sony RX100 II over Sony RX100

  • Tiltable Screen
    Tiltable vs Fixed
    Tilt the screen for shooting flexbility
  • Wi-Fi
    Wi-Fi vs None
    Share your photos wirelessly
  • Newer
    14 months vs 2 years old
    Newer cameras often support more advanced features
  • 24p
    Yes vs No
    Gives your movies a big-screen feel
  • Hot shoe
    Hot shoe vs None
    Off-camera flashes open new possibilities

Sony RX100 over Sony RX100 II

  • Bigger JPEG buffer
    Unlimited vs 9 shots
    Take more JPEG shots before waiting (single-shot mode)
  • Bigger RAW buffer
    Unlimited vs 4 shots
    Larger buffer for RAW shots (single-shot mode)

The Competition

Compared to Sony RX100 III

Sony RX100 II
Sony RX100 III
  • $610
  • 1 inch
  • Lens zoom ratio
  • Hot shoe
  • $788
  • 1 inch
  • Fast startup
  • Eye-level viewfinder
Sony RX100
Sony RX100 III
  • $484
  • 1 inch
  • Lens zoom ratio
  • Bigger JPEG buffer
  • $788
  • 1 inch
  • Tiltable Screen
  • Fast startup

Compared to Canon G16

Sony RX100 II
Canon G16
  • $610
  • 1 inch
  • Larger sensor
  • Tiltable Screen
  • $527
  • 1/1.7 inch
  • Lens zoom ratio
  • Fast startup
Sony RX100
Canon G16
  • $484
  • 1 inch
  • Larger sensor
  • More pixels
  • $527
  • 1/1.7 inch
  • Lens zoom ratio
  • Fast startup

Compared to Fujifilm XQ1

Sony RX100 II
Fujifilm XQ1
  • $610
  • 1 inch
  • Larger sensor
  • Tiltable Screen
  • $379
  • 2/3 inch
  • On-sensor phase detect
  • Wider angle lens
Sony RX100
Fujifilm XQ1
  • $484
  • 1 inch
  • Larger sensor
  • More pixels
  • $379
  • 2/3 inch
  • Wi-Fi
  • On-sensor phase detect

Compared to Canon N100

Sony RX100 II
Canon N100
  • $610
  • 1 inch
  • Focus peaking
  • Larger sensor
  • $352
  • 1/1.7 inch
  • Lens zoom ratio
  • Touchscreen
Sony RX100
Canon N100
  • $484
  • 1 inch
  • Focus peaking
  • Larger sensor
  • $352
  • 1/1.7 inch
  • Tiltable Screen
  • Lens zoom ratio

Compared to Nikon P340

Sony RX100 II
Nikon P340
  • $610
  • 1 inch
  • Focus peaking
  • Larger sensor
  • $351
  • 1/1.7 inch
  • Lens zoom ratio
  • Integrated ND filter
Sony RX100
Nikon P340
  • $484
  • 1 inch
  • Focus peaking
  • Larger sensor
  • $351
  • 1/1.7 inch
  • Lens zoom ratio
  • Wi-Fi

Review Excerpt

  • New, 20.2MP, 1-inch type, backside illuminated (BSI) image sensor produces superb image quality, with particular improvements in low light and high ISO; 3-inch tilting rear LCD screen handy for composing shots from difficult angles; Fast all-around performer with quick autofocus and virtually no shutter lag; New, multi-interface hotshoe for adding a strobe or optional electronic viewfinder; Built-in Wi-Fi with NFC.

  • Bigger and heavier than previous model; More expensive than previous model; Reduced burst performance when shooting RAW files; Somewhat confusing menu structure and control layout; Wi-Fi features can be difficult to set up.

  • Excellent high-ISO performance for such a compact model; Smart controls; Small body; Bright lens; 10fps full-res burst mode; Very fast shutter response; Excellent LCD.

  • Lens flare at night; Poor rendering of yellows; Slow flash recycling; Soft corners wide open; Continuous AF mode slow to lock.

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