Panasonic GF7 Image Quality Comparison

Below are crops from our laboratory Still Life target comparing Panasonic GF7 image quality to its predecessor, the GF6, well as against several competing mirrorless and DSLR models at similar price points or in similar categories: the Canon T5, Fuji X-A2, Nikon D3300 and Olympus E-PL7.

NOTE: These images are from best quality JPEGs straight out of the camera, at default settings including noise reduction and using the camera's actual base ISO (not extended ISO settings). All cameras in this comparison were shot with our very sharp reference lenses. Clicking any crop will take you to a carrier page where you can click once again to access the full resolution image as delivered straight from the camera. For those interested in working with the RAW files involved, click these links to visit each camera's respective sample image thumbnail page: Panasonic GF7, Canon T5, Fuji X-A2, Nikon D3300 and Olympus E-PL7 -- links to the RAW files appear beneath those for the JPEG images, wherever we have them. And remember, you can always go to our world-renowned Comparometer to compare the Panasonic GF7 to any camera we've ever tested!

Panasonic GF7 vs Panasonic GF6 at Base ISO

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 200
Panasonic GF6 at ISO 160

Sharing a similar 16MP chip and Venus Engine processor, it's not all that surprising that the GF7 and its predecessor display similar image quality at base ISO. Very fine detail is a little more crisp and cleaner from the GF7, though there are subtle contrast differences in the two images.

Panasonic GF7 vs Canon T5 at Base ISO

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 200
Canon T5 at ISO 100

Both cameras resolve a lot of detail, but the GF7 edges out with slightly more fine detail in the mosaic crop and the fabric swatches.

Panasonic GF7 vs Fujifilm X-A2 at Base ISO

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 200
Fujifilm X-A2 at ISO 200

The X-A2's bottle crop is impressively clean and crisp, though the GF7's mosaic crop appears more natural. The X-A2 struggles with the fabrics swatches, especially with the pink, whereas the GF7 captures a lot of fine detail in this area.

Panasonic GF7 vs Nikon D3300 at Base ISO

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 200
Nikon D3300 at ISO 100

The D3300 has a much higher-res sensor (24MP vs 16MP) and does not have an optical low-pass filter, and as a result easily captures much more detail than the GF7.

Panasonic GF7 vs Olympus E-PL7 at Base ISO

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 200
Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 200

Though different manufactures, both of these Micro Four Thirds cameras utilize a 16MP sensor, and as such, they capture a similar level of fine detail at base ISO -- though with a noticeable difference in the degree of in-camera sharpening in these default-settings JPEG crops.

Panasonic GF7 vs Panasonic GF6 at ISO 1600

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 1600
Panasonic GF6 at ISO 1600

Bumping up the ISO, you can see the difference in the noise reduction characteristics between the newer model and the old one. The GF7 bottle crop appears cleaner with less noise, and the mosaic crop also has a bit more detail from the GF7. The GF7's default NR processing, however, takes more detail from the tricky red-leaf fabric than the GF6.

Panasonic GF7 vs Canon T5 at ISO 1600

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 1600
Canon T5 at ISO 1600

Though the GF7's default NR does well to remove a lot of noise, especially in the shadows, it leaves behind some subtle visible artifacts while the T5 takes a less aggressive approach to NR. Detail is good from both cameras, but the GF7 has the edge with cleaner, more natural detail in the mosaic crop. Both cameras struggle with the red-leaf fabric, though the GF7 handles the pink fabric much better.

Panasonic GF7 vs Fujifilm X-A2 at ISO 1600

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 1600
Fujifilm X-A2 at ISO 1600

The X-A2 shows impressive high ISO performance! The bottle crop from the Fuji is practically devoid of noise, and there's still quite a lot of detail remaining in the mosaic crop, despite the seemingly strong NR processing. The red-leaf fabric proves tricky for both cameras, though, but the GF7 captures more detail in the pink fabric.

Panasonic GF7 vs Nikon D3300 at ISO 1600

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 1600
Nikon D3300 at ISO 1600

Nikon typically takes a lighter approach when it comes to noise reduction. Noise is much stronger from the D3300 compared to the GF7, however it allows for sharper, finer detail to remain. There's also a hint more definition to the leaf pattern in the red fabric from the Nikon than from the Panasonic.

Panasonic GF7 vs Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 1600

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 1600
Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 1600

The E-PL7's NR processing appears more aggressive compared to that from GF7. The Olympus does well removing noise, but the NR interferes with fine detail, which is quite evident when comparing the mosaic crops and pink fabric.

Panasonic GF7 vs Panasonic GF6 at ISO 3200

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 3200
Panasonic GF6 at ISO 3200

Bumping the ISO sensitivity even further, the improvements with the GF7 are even clearer. The new model has more refined NR processing, which removes a lot of noise, but allows for much cleaner detail.

Panasonic GF7 vs Canon T5 at ISO 3200

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 3200
Canon T5 at ISO 3200

As with the prior ISO, the Canon shows a lighter touch with NR processing. However, the GF7 does quite well at balancing noise removal and detail, and in fact, has the edge over the Canon with detail in the mosaic crop to our eyes, if only slightly. Again, both cameras have a tough time resolving detail in the fabric swatches, though the GF7 does better with the pink fabric.

Panasonic GF7 vs Fujifilm X-A2 at ISO 3200

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 3200
Fujifilm X-A2 at ISO 3200

At this higher ISO, we can better see the aggressive NR processing from the Fuji. Its bottle crop appears nearly devoid of noise again, but there a subtle over-processed look. The GF7, on the other hand, looks a bit overprocessed as well and yet displays more noise artifacts. Props to Fuji. The X-A2 also resolves more detail in the mosaic crop, though both struggle with the fabrics.

Panasonic GF7 vs Nikon D3300 at ISO 3200

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 3200
Nikon D3300 at ISO 3200

A light touch once again from the Nikon with noise reduction. More natural detail comes through, however more visible grain and noise is apparent compared to the Panasonic. Though clear detail isn't visible in either red fabric swatches, the Nikon crop appears more natural and less "mushy" than the Panasonic's.

Panasonic GF7 vs Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 3200

Panasonic GF7 at ISO 3200
Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 3200

The Olympus image is more contrasty, and its bottle crop looks a bit cleaner with less noise than the Panasonic's. Fine detail in the mosaic crop, however, looks more pleasing and natural from the Panasonic, as does detail in the pink fabric.

Panasonic GF7 vs. Panasonic GF6, Canon T5, Fujifilm X-A2, Nikon D3300, Olympus E-PL7

Panasonic
GF7
ISO 200
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Panasonic
GF6
ISO 160
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Canon
T5
ISO 100
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Fujifilm
X-A2
ISO 200
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Nikon
D3300
ISO 100
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Olympus
E-PL7
ISO 200
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Detail comparison. Comparing high-contrast detail, the clear champion in this comparison array is the Nikon D3300 -- a higher-res sensor than all the competition and no low-pass filter makes for cleaner detail at both low and higher ISOs. Comparing the rest of the field, most do rather well at base ISOs, though interestingly, the Fuji X-A2 performs rather poorly at all ISOs. The Panasonic GF7 does well throughout, though not showing significant improvements compared to its predecessor. These two and the Olympus E-PL7, however, trump the Canon T5 at low and higher ISOs.

 

Panasonic GF7 Print Quality Analysis

Very nice 24 x 36 inch prints at ISO 100/200; a good 8 x 10 inch print at ISO 3200; a quite usable 4 x 6 at ISO 12,800.

ISO 100 and 200 prints look practically identical to each other, and both ISOs print very nicely up to 24 x 36 inches. You can see very minor softness and extremely subtle pixelation if you look closely, but at typical viewing distances for prints of this size, they look very good with lots of detail and bright colors.

ISO 400 images look very similar to the previous ISOs, but with just the slightest hint of softness compared to ISO 200. That being said, we don't feel this impacts the print size at this sensitivity, and we're comfortable calling it at 20 x 30 inches here, as well.

ISO 800 prints top out at 16 x 20 inches. At this ISO sensitivity, images are now showing a bit more softness due to noise, but it's all very well controlled. Colors are still bright and pleasing, but lower contrast areas like our tricky red-leaf fabric are showing a drop in detail, for example.

ISO 1600 images show a further decrease in fine detail, making 11 x 14 inches the largest we're really comfortable with recommending. However, a 13 x 19 inch print could work for less critical applications.

ISO 3200 prints could perhaps work at 11 x 14 inches for less crucial shots, but the subtle increase in noise makes an 8 x 10 inch print the size we're calling for this sensitivity.

ISO 6400 images make for a nice 5 x 7 inch print. An 8 x 10 is a risky proposition, but it's not too bad -- just a bit too soft for our tastes. At 5 x 7 inches, detail and colors are quite nice at this ISO.

ISO 12,800 prints max out at 4 x 6 inches. Impressive for such a small camera, and noise appears well controlled at this print size, but any larger and it's a bit too noisy and soft.

ISO 25,600 images are too soft and noisy for our liking and should be avoided for prints.

Like its GM5 and GX7 cousins, the 16-megapixel Panasonic GF7 performs well in our print quality testing for a Micro Four Thirds model. The camera manages to impress with large, nicely detailed prints all the way up to 24 x 36 inches at ISOs 100 and 200, though they are just a touch soft. Towards the mid-range of ISOs, the GF7 manages to keep noise very well controlled, offering a nice 11 x 14 inch print at ISO 1600 or a solid 8 x 10 at ISO 3200. At the top end of the ISO scale, the GF7 manages to squeak out a usable 4 x 6 at ISO 12,800, but we'd recommend avoiding ISO 25,600 entirely for prints.

 

Buy the Panasonic GF7

Your purchases support this site

Kit with 12-32mm lens (Black)
  • Kit with 12-32mm lens (Black)
  • Kit with 12-32mm lens (Pink)
All GF7 Deals


Enter this month to win:

1 $300 Adorama Gift Certificate

2 $200 Adorama Gift Certificate

3 $100 Adorama Gift Certificate