Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports

 
Lens Reviews / Sigma Lenses i Not yet tested
60-600mm $1,999
average price
image of Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports

Updates:
02/22/2019: Field Test & Gallery Images added

 

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Field Test

How does the refreshed "Bigma" lens perform in the field?

by Jeremy Gray | Posted 02/22/2019

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 600mm (900mm equiv.), f/6.3, 1/640s, ISO 1250.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Photographers have been treated to a lot of great telephoto lenses recently, many of them being zooms. While there are the very expensive zoom lenses such as the Nikon 180-400mm f/4, which costs over $12,000 USD, many of them have been more affordable and within the reach of hobbyist photographers. One such lens is the new Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport lens, which costs right around $2,000. Not only is it reasonably affordable for a long lens, but this spiritual successor to the popular 50-500mm "Bigma" zoom offers an even more impressive zoom range of 60 to 600mm.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 600mm (900mm equiv.), f/6.3, 1/400s, ISO 640.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Key Features and Specs

  • 60-600mm full-frame zoom lens
  • Available for Canon EF, Nikon F and Sigma SA lens mounts
  • Constructed using a Thermally Stable Composite (TSC)
  • 105mm filter thread
  • Weighs 5.9 pounds (2.7 kilograms)
  • 10.6 inches (269mm) long with a maximum diameter of 4.7 inches (120mm)
  • Dust and moisture resistant
  • 25 elements across 19 groups
  • Includes three FLD elements and one SLD element
  • Hyper Sonic AF motor
  • Built-in image stabilization promising four stops of shake correction
  • Compatible with Sigma teleconverters and the Sigma USB Dock
  • MSRP is just under $2,000 USD
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review -- Product Image

Lens Design and Handling

It will come as no surprise that a 60-600mm full-frame zoom lens is pretty large and heavy. The lens is 10.6 inches (269 millimeters) long and has a maximum diameter of 4.7 inches (120mm). The lens weighs just under six pounds (2.7 kilograms). The included lens hood, which is a nice and sturdy hood, adds a bit over three more inches (around 90mm) to the total length of the lens. Further, when the lens is extended to 600mm, it is about four inches longer (100mm). With respect to feel and balance, on my gripped Nikon DSLR cameras, the lens felt quite nice and the weight was manageable.

The zoom ring has a very nice grip and is quite wide. The zooming mechanism feels smooth as well, although if you are aiming upward, like if you were tracking a bird in the sky, the lens does sometimes retract due to gravity, meaning you may need to hold the zoom ring extended to counteract this. Focal length markers are located at 60, 70, 80, 100, 120, 150, 200, 250, 300, 400 and 600mm focal lengths. A full zoom from 60 to 600mm requires around 100 degrees of rotation and can be done in a single motion, although the tripod foot can get in the way if it is rotated directly underneath the lens.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review -- Product Image

Speaking of the tripod foot, it has an Arca Swiss design and feels quite sturdy. It has a rotating design, which works well and has markings for each 90 degrees. The lens in general feels sturdy. It is constructed using Thermally Stable Composite (TSC) material and is sealed against dust and moisture. The rear and front elements are also coated to repel oil and water. It is also worth noting that the lens comes with an excellent padded case, which has foam inserts and a strap.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review -- Product Image

The lens has a few switches along the side, controlling focus mode, focus range, optical stabilization and custom settings. You can also lock the focal length with a separate switch, both to prevent any lens creep or to simply lock the lens at a specific focal length. Speaking of manual focus, the lens has a manual override mode and includes a focus scale, which is always a nice inclusion. The focus ring works fine, although it's unlikely to be a lens that is regularly focused manually for most users.

Overall, the lens has a nice construction and design. It may be large and heavy due to pure physics and optical engineering constraints, but it doesn't feel too bulky or cumbersome during real-world use. I felt comfortable handholding it for extended periods of time.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review -- Product Image

Image Quality

With any lens, there is always a balancing act for the manufacturer. How do you deliver a lens that is affordable, well-built and optically impressive while still being feasible for mass production? With a zoom lens, this balancing act becomes even trickier. In the case of the Sigma 60-600mm lens, Sigma must find a way to deliver good full-frame performance across a massive focal length range while being able to profitably produce the lens in multiple camera mounts for just $2,000. Plus, the lens has image stabilization and must be able to focus quickly and accurately. This is a huge undertaking.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 450mm (675mm equiv.), f/11, 1/640s, ISO 500.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 450mm (675mm equiv.), f/11, 1/640s, ISO 500.
100 percent crop from the above image. This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

The Sigma 60-600mm includes a whopping 25 elements across 19 groups. The complex optical formula includes three FLD elements and one SLD element. It's an impressive array of glass. The end result of all these elements is ultimately impressive center imaging performance on a full-frame camera throughout the focal length range, with minor concerns at the telephoto end and some issues with corner sharpness.

Sharpness

Note: All sharpness evaluation images below were created from raw images processed using Adobe Camera Raw at default settings with a normalized white balance. The images were then exported as high-quality JPEG files.

With a super telephoto zoom lens, it's safe to assume that many users won't spend a lot of time at the shortest end of the lens. However, part of the appeal of a zoom is that you can, in fact, zoom out. At 60mm, the central sharpness is quite impressive with the Sigma 60-600mm lens, even when shot wide open. There is some corner softness at f/4.5, but it gets noticeably better as you stop the lens down.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 60mm, f/4.5, 1.6s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
100 percent center crop. Shot with Nikon D800E. 60mm, f/4.5, 1.6s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
100 percent corner crop. Shot with Nikon D800E. 60mm, f/4.5, 1.6s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
100 percent center crop. Shot with Nikon D800E. 60mm, f/8, 5s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

At around 150mm (155mm in this case), center sharpness remains impressive when shooting wide open at f/5.3. Corner sharpness is noticeably poorer at 150mm than it is at 60mm, which is disappointing as this is still a decent focal length for landscape photography, a genre in which I usually desire edge-to-edge sharpness. If you stop down to f/11 or so, the corners do get a fair bit sharper though.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 150mm, f/5.3, 2s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 150mm, f/5.3, 2s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 150mm, f/5.3, 2s, ISO 100.
100 percent corner crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 150mm, f/11, 10s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 150mm, f/11, 10s, ISO 100.
100 percent corner crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

At 300mm, well within the "middle" area of the zoom range, the center sharpness performance continues to be pretty impressive when shot wide open. In this case, wide open is f/5.6, and the image quality is what I would consider fine. Stopping down will noticeably improve the sharpness in the center of the frame. In the corners, however, the situation isn't great; the corners continue to get softer as you zoom to longer focal lengths. There's not a lot you can do about it, as stopping down doesn't really sharpen the corners up all that much (except perhaps shoot on an APS-C camera).

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 300mm, f/5.6, 3s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 300mm, f/5.6, 3s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 300mm, f/5.6, 3s, ISO 100.
100 percent corner crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 300mm, f/8, 6s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 300mm, f/8, 6s, ISO 100.
100 percent corner crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

If you are interested in a lens such as the Sigma 60-600mm Sports zoom, then you are likely interested most in how it performs at the long end of the lens. In this case, it's a mixed bag. I want to get the bad news out of the way first. The lens performance is noticeably poorer when shot wide open at 600mm. Even in the center, there's a general softness to the image quality that isn't present when you zoom out a little. Further, the corners are bad. As for the positives, the lens is still pretty good at 600mm in the ways that matters most for applications such as wildlife photography. I captured plenty of images at 600mm that I would be happy to print. Further, if you stop down, even to f/8, which is admittedly not a great aperture for low-light wildlife photography but is generally still workable during the day, center sharpness is vastly improved.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 600mm, f/6.3, 4s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 600mm, f/6.3, 4s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 600mm, f/8, 5s, ISO 100.
100 percent center crop. This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

It may seem like I have had a fair number of negative things to say about the image quality from the Sigma 60-600mm lens, but I am actually quite impressed with its overall performance. It's a $2,000 full-frame lens that can shoot from 60 to 600mm. That moves the goalposts a bit. I don't expect the same performance with this lens at 600mm as you would get from a 600mm f/4 lens, obviously. Given its versatility, I am very pleased with the 60-600mm lens. Central sharpness is good throughout nearly the entire focal length range when shot wide open. I would like the lens to be a little sharper in the center at 600mm when shooting at f/6.3, but it's a fairly small complaint. By zooming out just a little or stopping down a bit, you can noticeably improve the sharpness. The Sigma 60-600mm lens allowed me to capture images in a way that very few other lenses can, and at the end of the day, it did so with enough sharpness. I can't ask for much more.

Vignette

The vignette performance of the lens is not great when shooting wide open, especially at the short end of the lens. However, it can be improved quite a bit by stopping down.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 60mm, f/4.5, 1/200s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 300mm, f/5.6, 1/100s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.
 
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 600mm, f/6.3, 1/80s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Aberrations

Aberrations are handled quite well by the Sigma 60-600mm lens. I didn't have many issues with chromatic aberrations save for some purple fringing around bright white areas in an image, particularly as you move toward the corners. It was never a big issue, but it is worth pointing out that performance was not perfect with respect to fringing.

Bokeh

Given the somewhat slow aperture throughout the focal length range of the 60-600mm lens, you won't get the same kind of easy subject separation that you would with a fast telephoto prime lens. However, the bokeh is still quite nice, especially at the longer end of the lens. When you are able to get close to your subject and have a lot of space between the subject and its background, bokeh performance can be really nice and you are able to achieve a blurry background.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 500mm (750mm equiv.), f/6.3, 1/640s, ISO 1600.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

In the image above, for example, I was very close to the subject and was at a long focal length (500mm), which resulted in a pretty smooth background. In the image below, shot at 600mm, the background was not very far behind the subject, which results in a somewhat cluttered background.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 600mm (600mm equiv.), f/6.3, 1/640s, ISO 450.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Summary

Overall, the image quality from the Sigma 60-600mm Sports lens varies from fairly good to really good. Through much of the focal length range, center sharpness is impressive. I am a little disappointed that the lens is not sharper at 600mm, although it does perform better if you stop down to f/8. I think this aperture is too slow for most wildlife photography, but it could be made to work in daytime conditions.

Shooting Experience

Autofocus

With its Hyper Sonic AF Motor, which includes an optimized AF algorithm for smoother focusing performance, the Sigma 60-600mm lens offers good overall focusing performance. Throughout the focal length range and on both Nikon D500 and D800E camera bodies, the lens focused pretty quickly. When you are near the close focus distance and shooting at long focal lengths, it is noticeably slower, but it still works well.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 600mm (900mm equiv.), f/6.3, 1/500s, ISO 2800.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Image Stabilization

The Sigma 60-600mm lens has built-in Intelligent OS Image Stabilization, which is rated for up to four stops of vibration reduction. The OS works well when shooting handheld, but my favorite part of its performance is how stable it makes the viewfinder when shooting. This is especially helpful when shooting at or near 600mm and when trying to locate a small subject.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 600mm (900mm equiv.), f/11, 1/125s, ISO 100.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Shooting experience summary

In general, the shooting experience with the Sigma 60-600mm lens is positive. The autofocus performance is good throughout much of the focal length range. Obviously, it won't be quite as snappy as an expensive telephoto prime lens, but I found it more than fast enough to handle wildlife photography. The focusing slows down a little bit at the long end of the lens, but it is nonetheless capable.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 600mm (900mm equiv.), f/6.3, 1/1250s, ISO 400.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 OS Sports Field Test Summary

This super-telephoto zoom is a great value

What I liked:

  • Good build quality
  • Impressive zoom capabilities
  • Versatile in the field
  • Good Optical Stabilization
  • A really good value
Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D500. 600mm (900mm equiv.), f/6.3, 1/500s, ISO 640.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

What I didn't like:

  • While understandably so, the lens is fairly large and heavy
  • Softer corners as you zoom
  • Some softness at 600mm

The Sigma 60-600mm Sport lens is impressive for a variety of reasons. It not only offers an impressive zoom range of 60 to 600mm on full-frame cameras, but it also delivers good all-around performance. The autofocus is good, image stabilization works well, and the lens is ruggedly built. While optical performance is not perfect, it is certainly good enough for most applications. For $2,000, the lens is a really nice option for wildlife and sports photographers. The maximum aperture, especially at 600mm, can be a little limiting in low light, but that's simply the tradeoff you must make to achieve this level of zoom at this price point. Sigma has done a really nice job balancing performance and price.

Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
Shot with Nikon D800E. 600mm (600mm equiv.), f/6.3, 1/640s, ISO 140.
This image has been converted and processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw. Click for the full-size image. Click here for the RAW file.

 

• • •

 

Product Overview

(From Sigma lens literature)

The world's first 10X optical zoom telephoto lens with a tele end of 600mm

Covering from 60mm to 600mm, the 10× hyper-telephoto zoom lens achieves the same level of high image quality as the SIGMA 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports. With the lens construction of 25 elements in 19 groups, consistent image quality can be created throughout the entire zoom range. This lens also incorporates Intelligent OS1 adopting the latest algorithm to deliver an image stabilization effect of 4 stops2. The high-speed AF, thanks to the HSM (Hyper Sonic Motor) with an updated algorithm, captures instantaneous photography movement. High ratio, high image quality, and high mobility -- The SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports marks the birth of a lens that is on another level from existing high ratio zoom lenses.

SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Review -- Product Image

[Key features]

1. High optical quality meeting the most stringent needs of professional photographers
This lens incorporates three FLD ("F" Low Dispersion) glass elements and one SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass element to provide excellent correction of magnification chromatic aberration encountered in hyper-telephoto shooting. This offers both high resolution and consistent edge to edge performance through the entire zoom range. In addition, when shooting at the focal length of 200mm, the SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports can also be used for telephoto macro photography, with a maximum magnification ratio of 1:3.3, thanks to its high rendering performance.

2. Incorporating multi-material to achieve both portability and durability
To achieve comfortable handling required for a 10x zoom lens while maintaining high optical quality, the SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports incorporates multi-material, such as magnesium, CFRP3, and TSC4. The use of these superior materials in the right place reduces the weight of the overall lens to enhance portability and ensure durability.

SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Review -- Product Image

3. Design that ensures photographers capture every desired moment
The zooming mechanism has been engineered to make both smooth rotation and straight zoom possible. In addition, as a lens from the Sports line, the dust- and splash-proof structure ensures safe use even in the most challenging shooting conditions. Together with the water- and oil-repellent coating on the front lens, this lens surely meets the exact requirements of professional photographers.

4. SIGMA 600mm hyper-telephoto zoom lens lineup accommodates diverse shooting styles
The arrival of the 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports expands the lineup of SIGMA's 600mm zooms to three lenses. The SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports is "versatile", focusing on high image quality and mobility, demonstrating superior coverage from a standard focal length to a hyper-telephoto range without switching to another lens. The 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports is composed of many metal parts aiming at a "robust" structure. The lineup of these two Sports line lenses that can meet the most stringent needs of professionals, together with the Contemporary line's "lightweight" 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary, which reduces weight and makes the shooting experience even more comfortable and convenient, SIGMA undoubtedly satisfies the diverse shooting styles of photographers.

SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Review -- Product Image

Other features

  • Tele Converters that are designed to match the current lens lineup (optional) can be attached. The addition of SIGMA's TELE CONVERTER TC-1401 or TELE CONVERTER TC-2001 produces an AF* 84-840mm F6.3-9 hyper-telephoto zoom lens or a MF 120-1200mm F9-13 hyper-telephoto zoom lens respectively.

    * When it is attached to cameras that are compatible with AF at F8, focus accuracy is not ensured on the telephoto side at the focal length scale more than 300mm.
  • Tripod socket with high usability

    • With 90° click (de-clickable) stops

    • Replaceable lens foot

    • Compatible with Arca Swiss type clamps (with stopper screw)

  • CFRP hood

  • Equipped with a focus limiter

  • Manual Override (MO) capable of switching two full-time manual modes

    * By setting it to the MO position, it switches to manual focus by rotating the focus ring even during continuous AF. Using the optional SIGMA USB DOCK, it is possible to adjust the MO position's sensitivity to switch to manual focus.
  • Zoom lock switch can be set to all marked focal lengths

  • Compatible with Canon Lens Aberration Correction

    * Function not available on all Canon cameras. Further, available corrections may vary by Canon camera model.
  • Nikon electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism included

  • Compatible with SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11

  • Compatible with SIGMA USB DOCK

  • Available Mount Conversion Service

  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting

  • Evaluation with SIGMA's own MTF measuring system: A1

  • 9-blade rounded diaphragm

  • High-precision, rugged brass bayonet mount

  • "Made in Japan" craftsmanship

Launch: October, 2018
Accessories: Case, Hood (LH1144-01), Cover Lens Cap (LC-740E), Shoulder Strap, Built-in Tripod Socket (Non-detachable)
Available AF mounts: SIGMA, Nikon F, Canon EF

Notes:
1. In Mode 2, the movements of subjects can be captured without losing panning effects thanks to the image stabilization function even when the camera is moved horizontally, vertically, or diagonally -- regardless of the position of the lens.
2. Based on CIPA guidelines (Measured in 600mm with a 35mm full-size image sensor).
3. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic, a light but strong material used in the interior and exterior fittings of aircraft, among many other applications.
4. Thermally Stable Composite (TSC) offers thermal expansion characteristics similar to those of aluminum. Since parts made with TSC expand and contract less due to changes in temperature, they tend to perform better under extreme conditions and help maintain the performance of the lens. TSC also offers outstanding elasticity. Compared to polycarbonate containing 20% glass, TSC offers approximately 70% higher elasticity. Compared to polycarbonate containing 30% glass, it offers 25% higher elasticity. (Comparison is between SIGMA-produced components.)

 

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